evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Visiting Venice soon? Do not miss: “Dietary Innovation and Disease in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries”

In Under-nutrition on June 3, 2016 at 7:09 am

from Dietary Innovation

San Servolo Island, Venice  /  8-10 June 2016

Gluten is seen as such a threat to health by some that foods that have never contained gluten are advertised as being ‘gluten-free’. In a range of popular health books and blogs, gluten—asociated with newer, high-yielding varieties of wheat, increased fertiliser and pesticide use, as well as modern bread-making processes—has been linked to autism, depression, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and some skin diseases. The link between dietary innovation and disease, both perceived and real, is nothing new, of course. From deficiency diseases to food intolerances, the nineteenth and twentieth centuries witnessed numerous innovations in food production, preparation and consumption that impacted on health. What are the economics and politics of dietary change? What are the health risks? This international conference on Dietary Innovation and Disease aims to unpack these current concerns by historicising and contextualising the relationship between dietary change and health in the past.

This conference is being organised as part of the research project ‘Rough Skin: Maize, Pellagra and Society in Italy, 1750-1930’, PI Professor David Gentilcore, and is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. The organisers are: David Gentilcore (School of History and Centre for Medical Humanities, University of Leicester) and Matthew Smith (Department of History and Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare, University of Strathclyde)

 Follow this link for the Call for Papers.

Follow this link for more information on the conference venue.

Also do not miss to check on these related events supported by the University Leicester:

  1. Rough Skin: Maize, Pellagra and Society in Italy, 1750-1930
  2. Exhibition: “Rough Skin”: Maize, Pellagra and Insanity in the Veneto, Italy, 1850-1900

 

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