evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘food aid’

The Enabling Effect of Food Assistance in Improving Adherence and/or Treatment Completion for Antiretroviral Therapy and Tuberculosis Treatment: A Literature Review

In Under-nutrition on April 4, 2014 at 3:17 pm

by Saskia de Pee, Nils Grede, Divya Mehra and Martin Bloem.

AIDS Behav – 2014

(download)

Abstract

 Socioeconomic costs of HIV and TB and the difficulty of maintaining optimal treatment are well documented. Social protection measures such as food assistance may be required to offset some of the treatment related costs as well as to ensure food security and maintain good health of the affected individual and household.

Programmes have started placing greater emphasis on treatment adherence and are looking for proven interventions that can optimize it. This paper looks at the effect of food assistance for enabling treatment adherence and reviews studies that used food assistance to promote adherence.

Eight of ten studies found that provision of food can improve adherence and/or treatment completion for HIV care and treatment, ART and TB-DOTS. This indicates that food provision is not only a biological, but also a behavioural intervention, and underscores that unresolved food insecurity can be an impediment to treatment adherence and consequently to good treatment outcomes.

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Food safety risks and consumer health

In Under-nutrition on February 2, 2014 at 11:27 am

by Bruce M. Chassy

New Biotechnology – Volume 27, Issue 5, 30 November 2010, Pages 534–544

CaptureAbstract

The major food safety risks are not eating a healthy diet, and failure to avoid foodborne illness. Over one billion people in the world suffer from food insecurity and malnutrition. Nutritionally enhanced transgenic crops such as Golden Rice are one potential strategy for reducing malnutrition in the world.
Transgenic crops are subjected to a rigorous pre-market safety assessment. The safety of novel proteins and other products is established, and through compositional analysis and animal studies, the safety of any observed changes is evaluated. These studies provide evidence that the new product is as safe as, or safer than, comparable varieties.
It must be asked, however, if this rigorous analysis is necessary, because unregulated crops produced by other breeding methods also undergo genetic changes and contain unintended effects. Golden Rice poses infinitesimally small, if any, risk to consumers whilst it has the potential to spare millions of lives each year.
However, because it is a transgenic crop, it cannot be deployed without years of expensive pre-market safety review. Paradoxically, if Golden Rice had been produced by less precise conventional methods of breeding, it would already be in the hands of poor farmers.
It is concluded that the hyper-precautionary regulatory process applied to transgenic crops works to the extreme disadvantage of the hungry and the poor.
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Enhancing Nutrition: A New Tool for Ex-Ante Comparison of Commodity-based Vouchers and Food Transfers

In Under-nutrition on September 26, 2013 at 2:25 pm

by David Ryckembusch, Romeo Frega, Marcio Guilherme Silva, Ugo Gentilini, Issa Sanogo, Nils Grede, and Lynn Brown

from World Development, Volume 49, September 2013, Pages 58–67

(download for free here)

Summary

This article presents a new analytical tool for ex-ante comparison of the cost-effectiveness of two transfer modalities in pursuing specific nutritional objectives. It does so by introducing a metric to score the nutrient value of a food basket—the Nutrient Value Score (NVS)—and explains how this metric can be combined with full supply chain analysis and costing to generate a new tool, the Omega Value. The use of the Omega Value allows policy-makers who design a program with nutrition objectives to compare direct food transfers and commodity-based food vouchers in terms of both cost efficiency and cost effectiveness.

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