evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘food security’

Infographics: The abc’s of food security

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on July 30, 2015 at 12:13 pm

by Food Tank

The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014

In Under-nutrition on September 16, 2014 at 10:10 am

from the FAO web page

(download)

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The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014 presents updated estimates of undernourishment and progress towards the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) and World Food Summit (WFS) hunger targets. A stock-taking of where we stand on reducing hunger and malnutrition shows that progress in hunger reduction at the global level and in many countries has continued but that substantial additional effort is needed in others.

Sustained political commitment at the highest level is a prerequisite for hunger eradication. It entails placing food security and nutrition at the top of the political agenda and creating an enabling environment for improving food security and nutrition. This year’s report examines the diverse experiences of seven countries, with a specific focus on the enabling environment for food security and nutrition that reflects commitment and capacities across four dimensions: policies, programmes and legal frameworks; mobilization of human and financial resources; coordination mechanisms and partnerships; and evidence-based decision-making.

 

WFP: Introducing the CARI (Consolidated Approach for Reporting Indicators of Food Security) | VAM Resource Center

In Under-nutrition on April 7, 2014 at 8:45 am

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The Consolidated Approach for Reporting Indicators of Food Security (or CARI)  is a WFP method used to analyse and report the level of food insecurity within a population.

Under the CARI approach, each surveyed household is classified into one of four food security categories.  This classification is based on the household’s current status of food security (using food consumption indicators) and their coping capacity (using indicators measuring economic vulnerability and asset depletion).

Instead of rambling on about the CARI here, we recommend you check out these resources below:

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Shorter, Cheaper, Quicker, Better Linking Measures of Household Food Security to Nutritional Outcomes in Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Uganda, and Tanzania

In Under-nutrition on February 23, 2014 at 9:01 pm

by Sailesh Tiwari, Emmanuel Skoufias, Maya Sherpa

Policy Research Working Paper 6584

World Bank – August 2013

(download the entire doc)

world bank

Abstract

Using nationally representative household survey data from five countries—three from South Asia (Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal) and two from Sub-Saharan Africa (Tanzania and Uganda)—this paper conducts a systematic assessment of the correlation between various measures of household food security and nutritional outcomes of children.The analysis, following the universally accepted and applied definition of food security, is based on some of the most commonly used indicators of food security.

The results show that the various measures of household food security do appear to carry significant signals about the nutritional status of children that reside within the household. This result holds even after the analysis controls for a wide array of other socio-economic characteristics of the households that are generally also thought to be associated with the quality of child nutrition. If using these food security indicators as proxy measures for the underlying nutritional status of children is of some interest, then the results show that simple, cost-effective, and easy-to-collect measures, such as the food consumption score or the dietary diversity score, may carry at least as much information as other measures, such as per capita expenditure or the starchy staple ratio, which require longer and costlier surveys with detailed food consumption modules.

Across five different countries in South Asia and Africa, the results suggest that the food consumption score, in particular, performs extremely well in comparison with all other measures from the perspective of nutritional targeting as well as for monitoring nutritional outcomes.

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Ground-breaking Book release: “The Road to Good Nutrition” – by multiple “very special” writers

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on October 5, 2013 at 12:49 pm

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Editor(s):

Eggersdorfer M.
Kraemer K.
Ruel M.
Van Ameringen M.
Biesalski  H.K.
Bloem M.
Chen J.
Lateef A.
Mannar V.

Some of the chapters are free for downloading here.

 

(from the Karger’s web site)

This is a work of advocacy, whose prime objective is to inform people about the relationship between nutrition security and public health. It draws on the thinking and experience of a selected number of experts in the field of nutrition and public health. Collating up-to-the-minute information in a clear and accessible way, the book forms a ‘one-stop information source’, and paves the way for further, science-led publications in this field. ‘The Road to Good Nutrition’ puts the topic of nutrition security on the agenda of policy-makers, academics, private sector organizations and civil society, as well as of organizations dedicated to the nutrition space. It is also of interest to the educated lay reader who is generally well informed in matters of health, nutrition and sustainability.
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New amazing book: “Food: riots and rights”

In Under-nutrition on October 4, 2013 at 8:18 am

by Luca Colombo and Antonio Onorati

(download the book here)

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The authors analyze the food system and its governance in its international dimensions as well as strategies for resilient and socially adapted agricultural and food systems.  The book includes contributions from different farmer and food producer organizations, members of the IPC (International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty).

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FAO: economic growth is necessary but not sufficient to accelerate reduction of hunger and malnutrition

In Under-nutrition on October 10, 2012 at 7:14 am

(from the FAO website, you can here download the entire document)

“The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2012 presents new estimates of undernourishment based on a revised and improved methodology.

“The new estimates show that progress in reducing hunger during the past 20 years has been better than previously believed, and that, given renewed efforts, it may be possible to reach the MDG hunger target at the global level by 2015. However, the number of people suffering from chronic undernourishment is still unacceptably high, and eradication of hunger remains a major global challenge.

“This year’s report also discusses the role of economic growth in reducing undernourishment. Sustainable agricultural growth is often effective in reaching the poor because most of the poor and hungry live in rural areas and depend on agriculture for a significant part of their livelihoods.

“However, growth will not necessarily result in better nutrition for all. Policies and programmes that will ensure “nutrition-sensitive” growth include supporting increased dietary diversity, improving access to safe drinking water, sanitation and health services and educating consumers regarding adequate nutrition and child care practices.

“Economic growth takes time to reach the poor, and may not reach the poorest of the poor. Therefore, social protection is crucial for eliminating hunger as rapidly as possible. Finally, rapid progress in reducing hunger requires government action to provide key public goods and services within a governance system based on transparency, participation, accountability, rule of law and human rights.”

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Literature Review and Institutional Analysis: Toward an Integrated Approach for Addressing Malnutrition in Zambia (IFPRI)

In Under-nutrition on August 28, 2012 at 8:09 pm

by Jody Harris and Scott Drimie

IFPRI Discussion Paper 01200 – August 2012

 

Abstract

Due to the predominance of direct, specific interventions in nutrition for development, the health sector tends to own nutrition, with interventions customarily implemented through health programs. That the agriculture sector should also be a vehicle for improved nutrition is intuitive, but this sector often delivers neither good nutrition nor food security to the most vulnerable in the population. The complex and multisectoral nature of malnutrition may explain why it has not been effectively addressed, even though we know many of the solutions; intersectoral action is critical to addressing this complexity, but to date there is no consensus on how intersectoral solutions are best implemented or institutionalized. This review brings together experiences from across Sub-Saharan Africa in order to draw out recommendations for improved intersectoral implementation going forward, and assesses how these findings apply specifically to the Zambian context.

The experiences reviewed suggest three broad barriers to intersectoral collaboration for nutrition: low political commitment and mobilization; sector-bound organizational structures and weak coordinating bodies; and lack of human resources and capacity. Key lessons for improved intersectoral implementation include the role of advocacy in framing the problem in context and highlighting mutual gains for different sectors, to create the political will and working space for nutrition action; the importance of organizational arrangements, including convening or coordinating bodies with multisectoral credibility to facilitate mobilizing and resourcing power; and the importance of building not only technical but also strategic capacity to manage multisectoral relationships for improved nutrition outcomes. Ultimately, these solutions will have to be tailored to country contexts.

Zambia is an ideal candidate for a country that could make a significant impact on its malnutrition problem. With the emergence of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) movement in the country, nutrition has received some high-level political attention, and the multi-sectoral nature of nutrition is recognized in overarching development policies and strategies. However, political attention has not moved into concrete action, and nutrition strategies, policies, and plans are essentially wish lists noting best practice, confined mainly to the health sector, created with substantial input from external actors, and without the backing of political commitment, budgetary or human resources, or capacity; implementation of these grand ideas is severely lacking. Several vital but attainable processes would improve intersectoral coordination for nutrition in Zambia and enable its potentially strong policy to be implemented across sectors. These include strategic lobbying for real political and social commitment to nutrition in sectors outside of health; strengthening the National Food and Nutrition Commission both in terms of its power to convene the different actors and the strategic capacity of its leadership; and improved technical training outside of core nutrition competencies in nutrition workers in general. These recommendations are interlinked; one cannot happen without the other, and all are necessary but not sufficient to improve the nutrition situation in Zambia. Movement should start in all areas at once, and the high-level momentum created by the SUN movement is an opportunity, providing the potential for cross-sectoral dialogue and increased resources, that should not be missed.

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Context-specific choice of food aid items (USAID)

In Under-nutrition on August 12, 2012 at 10:22 am


(click directly on the flowchart for an enlarged view)

In a recent document (2011), USAID, in collaboration with the UN Global Nutrition Cluster, UNHCR WFP and other organizations, suggest which type of programme and food commodities are more adequate.

However, it was concluded that there is no one food product that can meet every kind of programming goal, and no one programming approach that fits all needs.

The same panel  developed decision trees and few flow charts to help policy makers and donors in taking more informed decisions about programmes and choice of food-products.

The original program guidance is available here, whereas another version of the same, visible above, was adjusted in one chapter of my PhD thesis.

Open Source: a spread sheet application for planning, calculating and monitoring the Nutritional Value of food

In Under-nutrition on August 11, 2012 at 11:49 am

The planning, calculation, and monitoring application for food assistance programmes, NutVal 3.0 has an expanded database of commodities and products, and new population sub-groups to use for asssessing the adequacy of food assistance. NutVal is designed to run on Excel 2003 and later versions.

Download the most recent version of NutVal

NutVal was developed UNHCR, WFP, IGH/UCL and Global Nutrition Cluster.

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This blog hosts other posts related to the use of nutritional software.

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