evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘height-for-age’

The Effect of Adding Ready-to-Use Supplementary Food to a General Food Distribution on Child Nutritional Status and Morbidity: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

In Under-nutrition on February 5, 2014 at 11:18 am

by Lieven Huybregts, Freddy Houngbé, Cécile Salpéteur, Rebecca Brown, Dominique Roberfroid, Myriam Ait-Aissa, Patrick Kolsteren.

PLOS Medicine | 1 September 2012 | Volume 9 | Issue 9

(download the paper)

 

Abstract

Background

Recently, operational organizations active in child nutrition in developing countries have suggested that blanket feeding strategies be adopted to enable the prevention of child wasting. A new range of nutritional supplements is now available, with claims that they can prevent wasting in populations at risk of periodic food shortages. Evidence is lacking as to the effectiveness of such preventive interventions. This study examined the effect of a ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF) on the prevention of wasting in 6- to 36-mo-old children within the framework of a general food distribution program.

Methods and Findings

We conducted a two-arm cluster-randomized controlled pragmatic intervention study in a sample of 1,038 children aged 6 to 36 mo in the city of Abeche, Chad. Both arms were included in a general food distribution program providing staple foods. The intervention group was given a daily 46 g of RUSF for 4 mo. Anthropometric measurements and morbidity were recorded monthly. Adding RUSF to a package of monthly household food rations for households containing a child assigned to the intervention group did not result in a reduction in cumulative incidence of wasting (incidence risk ratio: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.67, 1.11; p = 0.25). However, the intervention group had a modestly higher gain in height-for-age (+0.03 Z-score/mo; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.04; p<0.001). In addition, children in the intervention group had a significantly higher hemoglobin concentration at the end of the study than children in the control group (+3.8 g/l; 95% CI: 0.6, 7.0; p = 0.02), thereby reducing the odds of anemia (odds ratio: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.82; p = 0.004). Adding RUSF also resulted in a significantly lower risk of self-reported diarrhea (−29.3%; 95% CI: 20.5, 37.2; p<0.001) and fever episodes (−22.5%; 95% CI: 14.0, 30.2; p<0.001). Limitations of this study include that the projected sample size was not fully attained and that significantly fewer children from the control group were present at follow-up sessions.

Conclusions

Providing RUSF as part of a general food distribution resulted in improvements in hemoglobin status and small improvements in linear growth, accompanied by an apparent reduction in morbidity.

 

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Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Are Feasible As a Breastmilk Replacement for HIV-Exposed Infants from 24 to 48 Weeks of Age

In Under-nutrition on March 23, 2013 at 5:54 am

by Valerie L. FlaxMargaret E. BentleyCharles S. ChaselaDumbani KayiraMichael G. HudgensKopekani Z. KachecheCharity ChavulaAthena P. KourtisDenise J. JamiesonCharles M. van der Horst, Linda S. Adair

 

J. Nutr. March 6, 2013 – (download)

 

Abstract

The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition (BAN) Study randomized HIV-infected mothers and their infants to receive either maternal lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) during lactation or no LNS and then to 1 of 3 antiretroviral drug (ARV) arms (maternal, infant, or no drugs).

Assigned interventions were provided from 0 to 28 wk and all infants (n = 1619) were given LNS during (24–28 wk) and following (28–48 wk) weaning. This paper assesses the feasibility of infant LNS as a breastmilk replacement and uses longitudinal random effects models to examine associations of interventions, morbidity, and season with weight-for-age (WAZ), length-for-age (LAZ), and BMI-for-age (BMIZ) Z-scores from 24 to 48 wk.

Infant LNS adherence was high (94.1% ate it daily). From 24 to 48 wk, mean WAZ (−0.42 to −0.76 SD; P < 0.001) and LAZ (−0.93 to −1.56 SD; P< 0.001) steadily declined, whereas BMIZ remained >0 throughout. A higher LAZ was associated with assignment to the maternal LNS arm (β=0.19; P < 0.05). Lower WAZ and BMIZ were associated with seasonal food insecurity (β=−0.08 and −0.09, respectively; both P < 0.001), fever (β=−0.07 and −0.13; both P < 0.001), diarrhea (β=−0.19 and −0.23; both P < 0.001), and assignment to the infant ARV arm (β=−0.17 and −0.17; both P < 0.05).

The magnitude of the season and morbidity effects was small and BAN infants had higher weights and lengths than their counterparts in the general population.

High LNS adherence and the modest impact of morbidity on growth indicate that LNS is a feasible breastmilk replacement for HIV-exposed infants weaned early, but controlled trials are needed to quantify the effects of LNS on growth in this population.

Predictors of stunting, wasting and underweight among Tanzanian children born to HIV-infected women

In Under-nutrition on October 24, 2012 at 7:52 am

McDonald CMKupka RManji KPOkuma JBosch RJAboud SKisenge RSpiegelman DFawzi WWDuggan CP.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct 3

Abstract

Background/Objectives: Children born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women are susceptible to undernutrition, but modifiable risk factors and the time course of the development of undernutrition have not been well characterized.

The objective of this study was to identify maternal, socioeconomic and child characteristics that are associated with stunting, wasting and underweight among Tanzanian children born to HIV-infected mothers, followed from 6 weeks of age for 24 months.

Subjects/Methods: Maternal and socioeconomic characteristics were recorded during pregnancy, data pertaining to the infant’s birth were collected immediately after delivery, morbidity histories and anthropometric measurements were performed monthly. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards methods were used to assess the association between potential predictors and the time to first episode of stunting, wasting and underweight.

Results: A total of 2387 infants (54.0% male) were enrolled and followed for a median duration of 21.2 months. The respective prevalence of prematurity (<37 weeks) and low birth weight (<2500 g) was 15.2% and 7.0%; 11.3% of infants were HIV-positive at 6 weeks. Median time to first episode of stunting, wasting and underweight was 8.7, 7.2 and 7.0 months, respectively. Low maternal education, few household possessions, low infant birth weight, child HIV infection and male sex were all independent predictors of stunting, wasting and underweight. In addition, preterm infants were more likely to become wasted and underweight, whereas those with a low Apgar score at birth were more likely to become stunted.

Conclusions: Interventions to improve maternal education and nutritional status, reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and increase birth weight may lower the risk of undernutrition among children born to HIV-infected women.

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The Effect of Adding Ready-to-Use Supplementary Food to a General Food Distribution on Child Nutritional Status and Morbidity: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

In Under-nutrition on October 10, 2012 at 3:07 pm

by Lieven Huybregts, Freddy Houngbe´, Cecile Salpeteur, Rebecca Brown, Dominique Roberfroid, Myriam Ait-Aissa, Patrick Kolsteren

PLoS Med. 2012 Sep;9(9)

(download the entire paper)

Abstract

Background

Recently, operational organizations active in child nutrition in developing countries have suggested that blanket feeding strategies be adopted to enable the prevention of child wasting. A new range of nutritional supplements is now available, with claims that they can prevent wasting in populations at risk of periodic food shortages. Evidence is lacking as to the effectiveness of such preventive interventions. This study examined the effect of a ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF) on the prevention of wasting in 6- to 36-mo-old children within the framework of a general
food distribution program.

Methods and Findings

We conducted a two-arm cluster-randomized controlled pragmatic intervention study in a sample of 1,038 children aged 6 to 36 mo in the city of Abeche, Chad. Both arms were included in a general food distribution program providing staple foods. The intervention group was given a daily 46 g of RUSF for 4 mo. Anthropometric measurements and morbidity were recorded monthly. Adding RUSF to a package of monthly household food rations for
households containing a child assigned to the intervention group did not result in a reduction in cumulative incidence of wasting (incidence risk ratio: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.67, 1.11; p = 0.25). However, the intervention group had a modestly higher gain in height-for-age (+0.03 Z-score/mo; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.04; p,0.001). In addition, children in the intervention group had a significantly higher hemoglobin concentration at the end of the study than children in the control group (+3.8 g/l; 95% CI:0.6, 7.0; p = 0.02), thereby reducing the odds of anemia (odds ratio: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.82; p = 0.004). Adding RUSF also resulted in a significantly lower risk of self-reported diarrhea (229.3%; 95% CI: 20.5, 37.2; p,0.001) and fever episodes (222.5%; 95% CI: 14.0, 30.2; p,0.001). Limitations of this study include that the projected sample size was not fully attained and that significantly fewer children from the control group were present at follow-up sessions.

Conclusions

Providing RUSF as part of a general food distribution resulted in improvements in hemoglobin status and small improvements in linear growth, accompanied by an apparent reduction in morbidity.

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An evaluation of an operations research project to reduce childhood stunting in a food-insecure area in Ethiopia

In Under-nutrition on August 28, 2012 at 8:52 pm

by Bridget Fenn, Assaye T Bulti, Themba Nduna, Arabella Duffield and Fiona Watson

Public Health Nutrition / Volume 15 / Issue 09 / September 2012 , pp 1746-1754

Abstract

Objective To determine which interventions can reduce linear growth retardation (stunting) in children aged 6–36 months over a 5-year period in a food-insecure population in Ethiopia.

Design We used data collected through an operations research project run by Save the Children UK: the Child Caring Practices (CCP) project. Eleven neighbouring villages were purposefully selected to receive one of four interventions: (i) health; (iii) nutrition education; (iii) water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); or (iv) integrated comprising all interventions. A comparison group of three villages did not receive any interventions. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted at baseline (2004) and for impact evaluation (2009) using the same quantitative and qualitative tools. The primary outcome was stunted growth in children aged 6–36 months measured as height (or length)-for-age Z-scores (mean and prevalence). Secondary outcomes were knowledge of health seeking, infant and young child feeding and preventive practices.

Setting Amhara, Ethiopia.

Subjects Children aged 6–36 months.

Results The WASH intervention group was the only group to show a significant increase in mean height-for-age Z-score (+0·33, P = 0·02), with a 12·1 % decrease in the prevalence of stunting, compared with the baseline group. This group also showed significant improvements in mothers’ knowledge of causes of diarrhoea and hygiene practices. The other intervention groups saw non-significant impacts for childhood stunting but improvements in knowledge relating to specific intervention education messages given.

Conclusions The study suggests that an improvement in hygiene practices had a significant impact on stunting levels. However, there may be alternative explanations for this and further evidence is required.

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Use of Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements by HIV-Infected Malawian Women during Lactation Has No Effect on Infant Growth from 0 to 24 Weeks

In Under-nutrition on May 31, 2012 at 6:23 am

by Valerie L. Flax5, Margaret E. Bentley, Charles S. Chasela, Dumbani Kayira, Michael G. Hudgens, Rodney J. Knight, Alice Soko, Denise J. Jamieson, Charles M. van der Horst, and Linda S. Adair

J. Nutr. July 1, 2012

Abstract

The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study evaluated the effect of daily consumption of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) by 2121 lactating, HIV-infected mothers on the growth of their exclusively breast-fed, HIV-uninfected infants from 0 to 24 wk. The study had a 2 × 3 factorial design. Malawian mothers with CD4+ ≥250 cells/mm3, hemoglobin ≥70 g/L, and BMI ≥17 kg/m2 were randomized within 36 h of delivery to receive either no LNS or 140 g/d of LNS to meet lactation energy and protein needs, and mother-infant pairs were assigned to maternal antiretroviral drugs (ARV), infant ARV, or no ARV. Sex-stratified, longitudinal, random effects models were used to estimate the effect of the 6 study arms on infant weight, length, and BMI. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds of growth faltering [decline in weight-for-age Z-score (WAZ) or length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) >0.67] using the control arm as the reference. Although some differences between study arms emerged with increasing infant age in boys, there were no consistent effects of the maternal supplement across the 3 growth outcomes in longitudinal models. At the ages where differences were observed, the effects on weight and BMI were quite small (≤200 g and ≤0.4 kg/m2) and unlikely to be of clinical importance. Overall, 21 and 34% of infants faltered in WAZ and LAZ, respectively. Maternal supplementation did not reduce the odds of infant weight or length faltering from 0 to 24 wk in any arm. These results indicate that blanket supplementation of HIV-infected lactating women may have little impact on infant growth.

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