evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘height-for-weigh’

Save the Children (NGO) about treatment of Acute Malnutrition: Minimum Reporting Package User Guidelines

In Under-nutrition on August 21, 2012 at 10:46 am

(download the entire doc)

“These minimum Reporting Package (MRP) User Guidelines are intended to outline the definitions, reporting categories and performance indicators for monitoring and reporting on three feeding programmes using the MRP software.

“The programmes are: targeted Supplementary Feeding Programmes (SFPs), Outpatient Therapeutic Programmes (OTPs) and Stabilisation Centres (SCs).

“There is also guidance on interpreting and taking action on programme performance indicators.

“The audience for the guidelines are nutrition programme coordinators and M&E staff of NGOs involved in the monitoring and reporting process.”

On this blog you can find more information about management of acute malnutrition, and ready to use foods for undernutrition treatment.
– – –

NB: You wish to follow up this or other topics from this blog? Type your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page.

Finally! Everything, really everything, about treatment of undernutrition (CMAM). In just-one-click-away, comprehensive, interactive, open-access, website.

In Under-nutrition on July 10, 2012 at 10:42 am

A new electronic forum improves the management of acute malnutrition. Worldwide.

In this area of humanitarian intervention, CMAM is the acronym mostly used: Community-based Management of Acute Malnutrition.

The CMAM forum not only hosts e-discussions about this topic, but also collects all the key documents endorsed by the WHO, other UN agencies, national and international NGOs. Otherwise scattered around, in their web sites.

World experts in this field (Andre’ Briend, and Mark Myatt among them) support this forum. Therefore, the target consists of practitioners rather than the general public.

The main focus list of the e-forum includes:

  • malnutrition and HIV/AIDS
  • malnutrition and infants, children, adolescents and adults, whose specificities are treated separately
  • malnutrition and health systems in the individual countries
  • evidence for action aiming policy-making, advocacy, support in the area of malnutrition treatment
  • product development for malnutrition rehabilitation
  • current research and existing evidences about most of the topics mentioned above
The web site has important tools:
  • you are interested in CMAM in a specific country? Visit the country section of the CMAM web forum
  • you wish to receive notices about meetings, conferences, trainings? You want to ask questions, learn how to calculate case loads, or simply follow up other people’s questions? Create your website account (for free)
  • you are interested in the latest evidence-based documents or the current state of research? Visit the related section of the forum
  • you can also contribute sharing, with the other forum members, the lessons learnt from your community-based feeding programme

This important forum was conceived thanks to the effort of many organizations. However, the realization was led by Valid International and Action Against Hunger.

If you find the CMAM forum interesting, do not hesitate to re-blog this post, or forward the link of the forum to relevant people.

If you have some constructive criticism or ideas to improve this new important tool, I encourage you to contact its coordinators: Nicky Dent and Rebecca Brown (contacts): I promise that they will be extremely happy to hear from you…

Revisiting the relationship of weight and height in early childhood

In Under-nutrition on April 25, 2012 at 6:22 am

SA Richard, RE Black, and W Checkley
Adv Nutr, January 1, 2012; 3(2): 250-4

“Ponderal and linear growth of children has been widely studied; however, epidemiologic evidence of a relationship between the two is inconsistent. Child undernutrition in the form of low height for age and low weight for height continues to burden the developing world. A downward shift in the distribution of height for age in the first 2 y of life is commonly observed in many developing countries and is usually summarized as the percentage stunted (height for age Z-score <-2). Similar shifts are seen in weight for height; however, weight-for-height shifts are often less extreme, perhaps because weight for height is more tightly biologically controlled. Low height for age and low weight for height in childhood share some common factors, including food insecurity, infectious diseases, and inappropriate feeding practices. Reductions in weight for height, generally seen as a short-term response to inadequate dietary intake or utilization, are thought to precede decreases in height for age; however, given an adequate diet and no further insults, catch-up linear growth can occur. Serial instances of decreased weight for height, however, are thought to limit the degree of catch-up growth attained, contributing to linear growth retardation. Additional research is needed to identify the factors associated with recovery of linear growth after a child experiences decreased weight for height. Although the direct relationship between weight for height and height for age is likely limited, each of these measurements indicates important information about the general health of children and their risk of the development of illness or dying; therefore, eliminating the downward shift of height for age and weight for height in developing countries should be prioritized as a public policy.”

http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;22516736

%d bloggers like this: