evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘IFPRI’

2018 Global food policy report

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on July 13, 2018 at 9:50 pm

from IFPRI web-page

Free Book on global – Pages: 150
IFPRI’s flagship report reviews the major food policy issues, developments, and decisions of 2017, and highlights challenges and opportunities for 2018 at the global and regional levels. This year’s report looks at the impacts of greater global integration—including the movement of goods, investment, people, and knowledge—and the threat of current antiglobalization pressures. Drawing on recent research, IFPRI researchers and other distinguished food policy experts consider a range of timely topics:

 

■ How can the global food system deliver food security for all in the face of the radical changes taking place today?

■ What is the role of trade in improving food security, nutrition, and sustainability?

■ How can international investment best contribute to local food security and better food systems in developing countries?

■ Do voluntary and involuntary migration increase or decrease food security in source countries and host countries?

■ What opportunities does greater data availability open up for improving agriculture and food security?

■ How does reform of developed-country farm support policies affect global food security?

■ How can global governance structures better address problems of food security and nutrition?

■ What major trends and events affected food security and nutrition across the globe in 2017?

The 2018 Global Food Policy Report also presents data tables and visualizations for several key food policy indicators, including country-level data on hunger, agricultural spending and research investment, and projections for future agricultural production and consumption.  In addition to illustrative figures, tables, and a timeline of food policy events in 2017, the report includes the results of a global opinion poll on globalization and the current state of food policy.

Big cities, small towns, and poor farmers: Evidence from Ethiopia

In Under-nutrition on July 10, 2018 at 6:06 am

World Development – Volume 106, June 2018, Pages 393-406

JoachimVandercasteelen, Seneshaw TemruBeyene, BartMinten, JohanSwinnen.

LICOS – Center for Institutions and Economic Performance, Department of Economics, University of Leuven, Waaistraat 6, Box 3511, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium
Ethiopia Strategy Support Program, Ethiopian Development Research Institute, International Food Policy Research Institute, PO Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Highlights

  • Urban population in medium sized cities has doubled in the last decade in Africa.
  • Secondary towns have clear effects for rural migrants, but unclear how they affect rural producers.
  • The paper analyses the impact of city types (primate vs. secondary) and urban proximity on agricultural intensification outcomes of rural teff producers in Ethiopia.
  • Secondary towns affect the proximity relationship between the primate city and the teff prices and modern input use of rural producers.
  • Selling teff in primate cities results in higher teff intensification while (instrumented) urban distance has a negative effect.

 

Abstract

Urbanization is happening fast in the developing world and especially so in sub-Saharan Africa where growth rates of cities are among the highest in the world. While cities and, in particular, secondary towns, where most of the urban population in sub-Saharan Africa resides, affect agricultural practices in their rural hinterlands, this relationship is not well understood.

To fill this gap, we develop a conceptual model to analyze how farmers’ proximity to cities of different sizes affects agricultural prices and intensification of farming. We then test these predictions using large-scale survey data from producers of teff, a major staple crop in Ethiopia, relying on unique data on transport costs and road networks and implementing an array of econometric models.

We find that agricultural price behavior and intensification is determined by proximity to a city and the type of city. While proximity to cities has a strong positive effect on agricultural output prices and on uptake of modern inputs and yields on farms, the effects on prices and intensification measures are lower for farmers in the rural hinterlands of secondary towns compared to primate cities.

Nutrition Key to Developing Africa’s “Grey Matter Infrastructure”

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on May 29, 2017 at 6:13 am

from IPSnews

AfDB President Akinwumi Adesina adressing delegates at the nutrition event while Ambassador Kenneth Quinn, World Food Prize Foundation, listens. Credit: Friday Phiri/IPS


AHMEDABAD, India, May 24 2017 (IPS) – Developing Africa’s ‘grey matter infrastructure’ through multi-sector investments in nutrition has been identified as a game changer for Africa’s sustainable development.

Experts here at the 2017 African Development Bank’s Annual Meetings say investing in physical infrastructure alone cannot help Africa to move forward without building brainpower.

“We can’t say Africa is rising when half of our children are stunted.” –Muhammad Ali Pate

“We can repair a bridge, we know how to do that, we can fix a port, we know how to do it, we can fix a rail, we know how to do that, but we don’t know how to fix brain cells once they are gone, that’s why we need to change our approach to dealing with nutrition matters in Africa,” said AfDB President, Akinwumi Adesina, pointing out that stunting alone costs Africa 25 billion dollars annually.

Malnutrition – the cause of half of child deaths worldwide – continues to rob generations of Africans of the chance to grow to their full physical and cognitive potential, hugely impacting not only health outcomes, but also economic development.

Malnutrition is unacceptably high on the continent, with 58 million or 36 percent of children under the age of five chronically undernourished (suffering from stunting)—and in some countries, as many as one out of every two children suffer from stunting. The effects of stunting are irreversible, impacting the ability of children’s bodies and brains to grow to their full potential.

On a panel discussion Developing Africa’s Grey Matter Infrastructure: Addressing Africa’s Nutrition Challenges” moderated by IFPRI’s Rajul Pandya-Lorch, experts highlighted the importance of urgently fighting the scourge of malnutrition.

Laura Landis of the World Food Programme (WFP) said the cost of inaction is dramatic. “We have to make an economic argument on why we need action,” she said. “The WFP is helping, in cooperation with the African Union and the AfDB, to collect the data that gets not just the Health Minister moving, but also Heads of State or Ministers of Finance.”

The idea is to get everyone involved and not leave nutrition to agriculture and/or health ministries alone. And panelists established that there is indeed a direct link between productivity and growth of the agriculture sector and improved nutrition.

Baffour Agyeman of the John Kuffuor Foundation puts it simply: “It has become evident that it is the quality of food and not the quantity thereof that is more important,” calling for awareness not to end at high level conferences but get to the grassroots.

Assisting African governments to build strong and robust economies is accordingly a key priority for the AfDB. But recognizing the potential that exists in the continent’s vast human capital, the bank included nutrition as a focus area under its five operational priorities – the High 5s.

And to mobilise support at the highest level, the African Leaders for Nutrition (ALN) initiative was launched last year, bringing together Heads of State committed to ending malnutrition in their countries.

As a key partner of this initiative, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation foresees improved accountability with such an initiative in place. “ALN is a way to make the fight against malnutrition a central development issue that Ministers of Finance and Heads of State take seriously and hold all sectors accountable for,” said Shawn Baker, Nutrition Director at the Foundation.

However, African Ministers of Finance want to see better coordination and for governments to play a leading role in such initiatives to achieve desired results. “Cooperation and coordination are key between government and development partners,” said Sierra Leone’s Finance and Economic Development Minister Momodu Kargbo. “Development partners disregard government systems when implementing programmes whereas they should align and carefully regard existing government institutions and ways of working.”

Notwithstanding the overarching theme of Africa rising, Muhammad Ali Pate, CEO of Big Win Philanthropy, says, “We can’t say Africa is rising when half of our children are stunted.” He pointed out the need to close the mismatch between the continent’s sustained GDP growth and improved livelihood of its people.

With the agreed global SDG agenda, Gerda Verburg, Scaling Up Nutrition Movement Coordinator sees nutrition as a core of achieving the goals. “Without better nutrition you will not end poverty, without better nutrition you will not end gender inequality, without better nutrition you will not improve health, find innovative approaches, or peace and stability, better nutrition is the core,” she says.

Therefore, developing Grey Matter Infrastructure is key to improving the quality of life for the people of Africa. But it won’t happen without leadership to encourage investments in agriculture and nutrition, and more importantly, resource mobilization for this purpose.

CGIAR: Call for concept notes: nutrition-relevant policy and action in eastern Africa

In Under-nutrition on October 7, 2014 at 7:37 am

from CGIAR web pageOctober 3, 2014 by

The Transform Nutrition Research Consortium, a network which seeks to transform thinking and action on nutrition among research, operational, and policy communities in South Asia and eastern Africa, invites proposals for studies of up to 24 months duration which will add to the evidence base on nutrition-relevant policy and action in eastern Africa.

 

The challenge

Nutrition is foundational to the achievement of major social and economic goals, including many international development goals. Undernutrition in early life is responsible for 45% of under-five child deaths, reduced cognitive attainment, increased likelihood of poverty and is associated with increased maternal morbidity and mortality.

 

Child stunting rates in eastern Africa are among the highest in the world. The four countries in this call (Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda and Tanzania) are home to around 13 million stunted children, and among the highest burden countries in the world. Ensuring food and nutrition security in the region can only occur through a combination of targeted “nutrition-specific” interventions and wider “nutrition-sensitive” development interventions, backed up by enabling policy, political and institutional environments, and processes. Political commitment to address undernutrition is growing in the region (all four countries, for example, have signed up to the SUN Movement) and nutrition policies and action plans are being drawn up or revised.

 

While progress is being made, much more can be done. Scoping work within both Transform Nutrition and A4NH have clearly revealed major operational and policy-related knowledge gaps that broadly relate to the thematic focus of this call. This call for concept notes is thus intended to help fill these knowledge gaps, through locally-relevant research undertaken by research organizations from the region.

 

Click here to download the Call for Research Concept Notes.

 

This call seeks to engender a wider sense of engagement in nutrition-relevant research among national and regional stakeholders in four countries of eastern Africa: Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda and Tanzania. We seek high quality research proposals on at least one of the following research themes:

 

Theme 1: How can nutrition-specific interventions be appropriately prioritized, implemented, scaled up, and sustained in different settings?

Theme 2: How can agriculture and the wider agri-food systems become more nutrition-sensitive and have a greater impact on nutrition outcomes?

Theme 3: How can enabling (policy and institutional) environments for nutrition be cultivated and sustained?

 

Cross-cutting issues include: governance, inclusion (socio-economic and gender equity) and fragility. Gendered approaches are especially important for proposals under Theme 2.

 

Eligibility criteria and important considerations:

  • Applicants are encouraged to familiarize themselves with work underway or completed by Transform and A4NH (accessible via websites above) to maximize “value added” and complementarity with ongoing work, and avoid duplication.
  • Applicant organisations must be legally registered entities in one of the four focal countries, capable of receiving and managing funds.
  • Joint applications by more than one organization are encouraged, but one local organization must be specified as the lead.
  • An organisation may submit more than one application, and an individual may be involved in multiple proposals, but any individual may be the lead researcher on only one application.
  • Partner organizations within Transform Nutrition or A4NH may collaborate in proposed studies, but they are exempt from leading the call, and funds for their participation will need to be separately sourced.
  • Research studies may be of 6-24 months duration.
  • The requested budget for each study should lie in the range: $50,000 – $150,000. Studies that are more expensive may be considered so long as there is guaranteed co-funding to meet requirements beyond this range.
  • Each of the three themes has its own budget ceiling of $150,000.
  • It is expected that 3-6 studies (in total) will be funded through this call, with at least one study from each theme.

 

Evaluation criteria

  • quality of the concept note and proposed research
  • relevance and “value added” with regard to Transform and A4NH’s work
  • value for money
  • internal capacity (for high quality research and efficient project management)
  • clearly specified policy relevance and potential for impact

 

Format of concept notes

Please submit a concept note of no more than 3 pages (single-spaced) that clearly states:

  • problem statement (including which theme(s) the project responds to),
  • context (including what is known already),
  • objectives and research questions,
  • study design and methods to be used,
  • expected outputs, outcomes and impact,
  • lead researcher, core research team and partners (CVs not required at this stage)
  • timeframe,
  • indicative budget (with breakdowns of personnel, travel and other expenses.)

No additional material will be considered.

 

Review and selection process

The following process will be adopted:

  1. Applicant organizations are invited (through this call) to respond by 21 November 2014, and according to specified eligibility and evaluation criteria, and format, with a concept note.
  2. Concept notes will be screened against these criteria and quality filters by a review team comprising members of TN and A4NH, to select a shortlist.
  3. Shortlisted applicants will be invited to prepare detailed research proposals (by 15 January 2015)
  4. These proposals will again be reviewed by the review panel, using a standard scoring system before 30 January 2015.
  5. The winning research proposals will then be announced.
  6. Contracts will be agreed with lead organizations in February 2015.
  7. Studies will start no later than 1 March 2015.

 

Concept notes should be emailed to Sivan Yosef (IFPRI) at s.yosef@cgiar.org

All queries concerning this call should be addressed to Catherine Gee at c.gee@cgiar.org

 

*Final deadline for concept notes is 21 November 2014, (23:59 GMT).

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