evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘london school of hygiene and tropical medicine’

LSHTM: (free courses on) (1) ‘Agriculture, Nutrition and Health’ and (2) ‘Programming for Nutrition Outcomes Self enrolment’

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on March 3, 2018 at 2:13 pm

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor lshtm logo

weblink source on Agriculture, Nutrition and Health

This open-access course has been designed to explore the multi-sectoral links between agriculture, nutrition and health, highlight current evidence and identify potential programmatic solutions.

A printed and personalised Certificate of Participation can be obtained for a fee of £30. In order to be eligible for a Certificate of Participation, registered participants must complete the assessment for the two core sessions (Sessions 1 and 2). This assessment is a set of multiple choice questions that can be found in the Certification for Core Sessions section. This assessment must be attempted in order to be eligible for a Certification of Participation, but there is no defined pass mark.


Afbeeldingsresultaat voor lshtm logo

weblink source on  Programming for Nutrition Outcomes

This course has been designed to explore the complicated problem of undernutrition, highlight its multi-sectoral causes and identify potential programmatic solutions. Chronic undernutrition affects nearly 200 million children in low- and middle-income countries and there is strong evidence that undernutrition is associated with up to 45% of all child deaths globally.

A printed and personalised Certificate of Participation can be obtained for a fee of £30. In order to be eligible for a Certificate of Participation, registered participants must complete the assessment for the three core sessions (Sessions 1 to 3). This assessment is a set of multiple choice questions that can be found in the Certification for Core Sessions section. This assessment must be attempted in order to be eligible for a Certification of Participation, but there is no defined pass mark.

 

Study suggests 258,000 Somalis died due to severe food insecurity and famine; Half of deaths were children under 5

In Under-nutrition on May 25, 2013 at 1:08 pm
Issued: May 2, 2013 – FSNAU website.

 

NAIROBI/WASHINGTON May 2, 2013 — A new study estimates that famine and severe food insecurity in Somalia claimed the lives of about 258,000 people between October 2010 and April 2012, including 133,000 children under 5.

Jointly funded and commissioned by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit for Somalia (FSNAU) and the USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET), the study is the first scientific estimate of the death toll from the food security emergency. The study suggests:

  • An estimated 4.6 percent of the total population and 10 percent of children under 5 died in Southern and Central Somalia.
  • Lower Shabelle, Mogadishu, and Bay were hardest hit, with the proportion of children under 5 who died in these areas estimated to be about 18 percent, 17 percent, and 13 percent, respectively.
  • Mortality peaked at about 30,000 excess deaths per month between May and August 2011 (see figure).

“With the expertise of two renowned institutions, we now have a picture of the true enormity of this human tragedy,’’ said Mark Smulders, Senior Economist for FAO. “Lessons drawn from this experience will help the international community, together with the people of the region, build a stronger and more resilient future.”

Lead authors of the study were Francesco Checchi, an epidemiologist and senior lecturer at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Courtland Robinson, a demographer and Assistant Professor at the Center for Refugee and Disaster Response at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland.

“By nature, estimating mortality in emergencies is an imprecise science, but given the quantity and quality of data that were available, we are confident in the strength of the study,” said Chris Hillbruner, Decision Support Advisor for FEWS NET. “It suggests that what occurred in Somalia was one of the worst famines in the last 25 years.”

The study set out to quantify mortality attributable to severe food insecurity and famine, as well as when and where most deaths occurred. Other issues, such as the humanitarian response, were not evaluated. The study covered all of southern and central Somalia, the areas most affected by the 2010-11 drought, subsequent spikes in staple food prices, and constraints on humanitarian access. Mortality among new refugees arriving to camps at Dadaab, Kenya and Dollo Ado, Ethiopia was also assessed.

To capture the full scope of the emergency, the study considered a 28-month time period, from April 2010 to July 2012. However, the mortality estimates relate specifically to October 2010 to April 2012.

The figures are in addition to the 290,000 “baseline” deaths estimated to have occurred in the same area during the same period. That baseline, which includes conflict-related deaths, represents a mortality rate that is twice as high as the sub-Saharan average.

Compared to the 1992 Somalia famine, in which an estimated 220,000 people died over 12 months, the death toll for the recent event was higher. But the earlier famine is considered more severe because a larger percentage of the population died.

Download Technical Release (PDF, 264KB)

 

– – –

NB – To follow up this topic (or others), enter your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page (you can un-subscribe any time).

%d bloggers like this: