evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘mental-health’

Maternal Multiple Micronutrient Supplements and Child Cognition: A Randomized Trial in Indonesia

In Under-nutrition on September 1, 2012 at 7:20 am

Elizabeth L. PradoKatherine J. AlcockHusni MuadzMichael T. UllmanAnuraj H. Shankar, for the SUMMIT Study Group

Pediatrics. August 20, 2012

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relative benefit of maternal multiple micronutrient (MMN) supplementation during pregnancy and until 3 months postpartum compared with iron/folic acid supplementation on child development at preschool age (42 months).

METHODS: We assessed 487 children of mothers who participated in the Supplementation with Multiple Micronutrients Intervention Trial, a cluster-randomized trial in Indonesia, on tests adapted and validated in the local context measuring motor, language, visual attention/spatial, executive, and socioemotional abilities. Analysis was according to intention to treat.

RESULTS: In children of undernourished mothers (mid-upper arm circumference <23.5 cm), a significant benefit of MMNs was observed on motor ability (B = 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.08–0.70]; P = .015) and visual attention/spatial ability (B = 0.37 [95% CI: 0.11–0.62]; P = .004). In children of anemic mothers (hemoglobin concentration <110 g/L), a significant benefit of MMNs on visual attention/spatial ability (B = 0.24 [95% CI: 0.02–0.46]; P = .030) was also observed. No robust effects of maternal MMN supplementation were found in any developmental domain over all children.

CONCLUSIONS: When pregnant women are undernourished or anemic, provision of MMN supplements can improve the motor and cognitive abilities of their children up to 3.5 years later, particularly for both motor function and visual attention/spatial ability. Maternal MMN but not iron/folic acid supplementation protected children from the detrimental effects of maternal undernutrition on child motor and cognitive development.

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Effects of psychosocial stimulation on improving home environment and child-rearing practices: results from a community-based trial among severely malnourished children in Bangladesh

In Under-nutrition on August 9, 2012 at 12:45 pm

Nahar BHossain MIHamadani JDAhmed TGrantham-McGregor SPersson LA.

BMC Public Health. 2012 Aug 7;12(1):622. [Epub ahead of print]

 

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Parenting programmes are effective in enhancing parenting practices and child development. This study evaluated the effects of a intervention with psychosocial stimulation (PS) on the quality of the home environment and mothers’ child-rearing practices in a community-based trial with severely malnourished Bangladeshi children.

METHOD:

Severely underweight children (n = 507), 6-24 months of age, were randomly assigned to five groups: PS; food supplementation (FS); PS + FS; clinic-control (CC); and, hospital-control (CH). PS included fortnightly follow-up visits for six months at community clinics where a play leader demonstrated play activities and gave education on child development and child rearing practices. FS comprised cereal-based supplements (150-300 kcal/day) for three months. All groups received medical care, micronutrient supplements and growth monitoring. Mothers were given the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) inventory and a questionnaire on parenting at baseline and after six months to assess the outcome.

RESULTS:

322 children completed the study. After six months of intervention the PS + FS and PS groups benefitted in the total HOME score (depending on the comparison group, effect sizes varied from 0.66 to 0.33 SD) The PS + FS and PS groups also benefitted in two HOME subscales: maternal involvement (effect sizes: 0.8 to 0.55 SD) and play materials, (effect sizes: 0.46 to 0.6 SD), and child-rearing practices scores (effect size: 1.5 to 1.1 SD). The PS + FS group benefitted 4.0 points in total HOME score compared with CH, 4.8 points compared with CC and 4.5 points compared with FS (p < 0.001 for all). The PS group benefitted 2.4 points compared with CH (p = 0.035), 3.3 points compared with CC (p = 0.004), and 2.9 points compared with FS (p = 0.006). Child-rearing practice scores of the PS + FS group improved 7.7, 6.4 and 6.6 points and the PS group improved 8.5, 7.2 and 7.4 points more than CH, CC and FS, respectively (p < 0.001 for all).

CONCLUSIONS:

Child-rearing practices of mothers of severely malnourished children and the quality of their home environment can be improved through community-based psychosocial stimulation with or without food supplementation. This may be of importance to promote child development.

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