evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘micronutrient deficiencies’

The Growing Price Gap between More and Less Healthy Foods: Analysis of a Novel Longitudinal UK Dataset

In Under-nutrition on October 15, 2014 at 4:21 pm

Nicholas R. V. Jones, Annalijn I. Conklin, Marc Suhrcke, Pablo Monsivais

Published: October 08, 2014

from PlosOne web site – download the paper

 

Objectives

The UK government has noted the public health importance of food prices and the affordability of a healthy diet. Yet, methods for tracking change over time have not been established. We aimed to investigate the prices of more and less healthy foods over time using existing government data on national food prices and nutrition content.

Methods

We linked economic data for 94 foods and beverages in the UK Consumer Price Index to food and nutrient data from the UK Department of Health’s National Diet and Nutrition Survey, producing a novel dataset across the period 2002–2012. Each item was assigned to a food group and also categorised as either “more healthy” or “less healthy” using a nutrient profiling model developed by the Food Standards Agency. We tested statistical significance using a t-test and repeated measures ANOVA.

Results

The mean (standard deviation) 2012 price/1000 kcal was £2.50 (0.29) for less healthy items and £7.49 (1.27) for more healthy items. The ANOVA results confirmed that all prices had risen over the period 2002–2012, but more healthy items rose faster than less healthy ones in absolute terms:£0.17 compared to £0.07/1000 kcal per year on average for more and less healthy items, respectively (p<0.001).

Conclusions

Since 2002, more healthy foods and beverages have been consistently more expensive than less healthy ones, with a growing gap between them. This trend is likely to make healthier diets less affordable over time, which may have implications for individual food security and population health, and it may exacerbate social inequalities in health. The novel data linkage employed here could be used as the basis for routine food price monitoring to inform public health policy.

Nutrition for a Better Tomorrow: Scaling Up Delivery of Micronutrient Powders for Infants and Young Children

In Under-nutrition on April 19, 2013 at 10:55 am

Results for Development Institute

By Kanika Bahl, Emilia Toro, Claire Qureshi, and Pooja Shaw

Click to download the summary or the entire document.

 

Capture

Efficacy of a high-dose in addition to daily low-dose vitamin A in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition with other illnesses

In Under-nutrition on August 29, 2012 at 11:49 am

by Sattar SAhmed TRasul CHSaha DSalam MAHossain MI

PLoS One. 2012;7(3):e33112. Epub 2012 Mar 27

(download the entire paper)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Efficacy of high-dose vitamin A (VA) in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) has recently been questioned. This study compared the efficacy of a single high-dose (200,000 IU) in addition to daily low-dose (5000 IU) VA in the management of children suffering from SAM with diarrhea and/or acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI).

METHODS:

In a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial in icddr,b, Bangladesh during 2005-07, children aged 6-59 months with weight-for-height <-3 Z-score and/or bipedal edema (SAM) received either a high-dose VA or placebo on admission day. Both the groups received 5,000 IU/day VA in a multivitamins drop for 15 days and other standard treatment which is similar to WHO guidelines.

RESULTS:

A total 260 children (130 in each group) were enrolled. All had diarrhea, 54% had concomitant ALRI, 50% had edema, 48.5% were girl with a mean±SD age of 16±10 months. None had clinical signs of VA deficiency. Mean±SD baseline serum retinol was 13.15±9.28 µg/dl, retinol binding protein was 1.27±0.95 mg/dl, and pre-albumin was 7.97±3.96 mg/dl. Median (inter quartile range) of C-reactive protein was 7.8 (2.1, 22.2) mg/L. Children of the two groups did not differ in any baseline characteristic. Over the 15 days treatment period resolution of diarrhea, ALRI, edema, anthropometric changes, and biochemical indicators of VA were similar between the groups. The high-dose VA supplementation in children with SAM did not show any adverse event.

CONCLUSIONS:

Efficacy of daily low-dose VA compared to an additional single high-dose was not observed to be better in the management of children suffering from SAM with other acute illnesses. A single high-dose VA may be given especially where the children with SAM may leave the hospital/treatment center early.

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Shame: AID FOR NUTRITION

In Under-nutrition on August 19, 2012 at 10:15 am

The organization Action Against Hunger has released a brave, land marking “detailed analysis of current spending on nutrition and of the adequacy of current aid reporting systems“.

Despite the issues related to data collection, the results are striking:

  • “Investment in nutrition is inadequate. Current investments in proven nutrition interventions account for approximately 1% of the estimated US$11.8 billion required to tackle undernutrition
  • “44% of investments in direct nutrition interventions were allocated to projects to reduce micronutrient deficiencies, 40% to treat malnourished children with special foods and 14% to promote good nutritional practices
  • “Comprehensive programmes which deliver the full package of direct nutrition interventions were inadequate (only 2% of funding)
  • “Nutrition programmes were mainly delivered through the health sector or in response to humanitarian crises. Few are delivered through development programmes indicating the reactive, short-term and unpredictable nature of aid for nutrition
  • The “data indicates that aid is not necessarily directed to the countries with the highest burden (in terms of caseload) of undernutrition, particularly in the Africa region
  • “Fulfilment of individual donor commitments varied widely. Collectively, there was a negative trend indicating that donors failed to deliver 11% of their commitments”

The same document reports also important recommendations for the future.

Download the entire paper, here

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