evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘nutrition-sensitive’

Designing programs to improve diets for maternal and child health: estimating costs and potential dietary impacts of nutrition-sensitive programs in Ethiopia, Nigeria, and India

In Under-nutrition on July 10, 2018 at 6:21 am

from: Health Policy and Planning, Volume 33, Issue 4, 1 May 2018, Pages 564–573

William A Masters Katherine L Rosettie Sarah Kranz Goodarz Danaei Patrick Webb Dariush Mozaffarianthe Global Nutrition and Policy Consortium.

(download here)

Abstract

Improving maternal and child nutrition in resource-poor settings requires effective use of limited resources, but priority-setting is constrained by limited information about program costs and impacts, especially for interventions designed to improve diet quality.

This study utilized a mixed methods approach to identify, describe and estimate the potential costs and impacts on child dietary intake of 12 nutrition-sensitive programs in Ethiopia, Nigeria and India.

These potential interventions included conditional livestock and cash transfers, media and education, complementary food processing and sales, household production and food pricing programs. Components and costs of each program were identified through a novel participatory process of expert regional consultation followed by validation and calibration from literature searches and comparison with actual budgets. Impacts on child diets were determined by estimating of the magnitude of economic mechanisms for dietary change, comprehensive reviews of evaluations and effectiveness for similar programs, and demographic data on each country.

Across the 12 programs, total cost per child reached (net present value, purchasing power parity adjusted) ranged very widely: from 0.58 to 2650 USD/year among five programs in Ethiopia; 2.62 to 1919 USD/year among four programs in Nigeria; and 27 to 586 USD/year among three programs in India.

When impacts were assessed, the largest dietary improvements were for iron and zinc intakes from a complementary food production program in Ethiopia (increases of 17.7 mg iron/child/day and 7.4 mg zinc/child/day), vitamin A intake from a household animal and horticulture production program in Nigeria (335 RAE/child/day), and animal protein intake from a complementary food processing program in Nigeria (20.0 g/child/day).

These results add substantial value to the limited literature on the costs and dietary impacts of nutrition-sensitive interventions targeting children in resource-limited settings, informing policy discussions and serving as critical inputs to future cost-effectiveness analyses focusing on disease outcomes.

Key message

Existing evidence on cost-effectiveness for nutrition improvement focuses on interventions to address specific diseases. We provide a novel participatory approach to assembling cost and impact data for 12 nutrition-sensitive interventions to improve diet quality in three countries: Ethiopia, Nigeria and India. Programs designed by stakeholders often use resource transfers to influence diets despite their high cost; programs altering food access have lower cost. Future work using these data will analyse net cost-effectiveness.

Food systems and diets: facing the challenges of the 21st century

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on September 27, 2016 at 7:26 am

from the webpage of the Global Panel on Agriculture and Food Systems for Nutrition

(download the report here)

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The Global Panel on Agriculture and Food Systems for Nutrition published its new Report, Food systems and diets: Facing the challenges of the 21st century on the 23rd September 2016.

This evidence-based Report is designed to help policymakers make their food systems more supportive of high quality diets.

The need for action on malnutrition

Poor diet is the number one risk factor driving the world’s disease burden.

Three billion people from 193 countries now have low quality diets and nearly half of all countries are experiencing the simultaneous problem of serious levels of undernutrition, overweight and obesity. Yet our global understanding about the quality of our diets is limited.

The Report

Using modelling and trend analysis, the Report generates a new understanding of diets and food systems, and how they could change by 2030.

The analysis shows that if current trends continue, by 2030 nearly half of the world’s adult population will be overweight or obese, up from one third today. The poorest countries are not immune to these trends.

It also shows how these trends have enormous economic impacts at the macro and micro levels, as well major consequences for mortality and morbidity. For example, at the macro level, cost are estimated to represent an annual loss of 10% global GDP, equivalent to a global financial crisis every year.

Drawing on over 250 data sources and peer-reviewed articles, the Report lists a series of recommendations for policymakers in low and middle income countries through a ‘Call to Action’.

The Report presents evidence showing that the risk that poor diets pose to mortality and morbidity is now greater than the combined risks of unsafe sex, alcohol, drug and tobacco use.

But, as the Report shows that there are many opportunities for action within the food system.

A Call to Action

This Report identifies decisions that policymakers need to take in the coming decade, particularly for women and children, to invest in effective policies to reduce all forms of malnutrition, repositioning food systems from feeding people to nourishing people.

Actions which go beyond agriculture to encompass trade, the environment and health, harnessing the power of the private sector and empowering consumers to demand better diets.

Enhancing the ability of food systems to deliver high quality diets is a choice that is well within the grasp of policymakers.  It is a choice that will help achieve the SDG goal of ending malnutrition in all its forms by 2030. It is a choice that will reap benefits for decades to come, for all people, in all countries.

Only a response on the scale and commitment used to tackle HIV/AIDS and malaria will be sufficient to meet the challenge, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

“This Report makes clear the enormous challenge posed by malnutrition and poor diets generally to the detriment of many millions of individuals and indeed whole economies.”

Sir John Beddington, Co-Chair of the Global Panel, and former UK Chief Scientific Advisor

CGIAR: Call for concept notes: nutrition-relevant policy and action in eastern Africa

In Under-nutrition on October 7, 2014 at 7:37 am

from CGIAR web pageOctober 3, 2014 by

The Transform Nutrition Research Consortium, a network which seeks to transform thinking and action on nutrition among research, operational, and policy communities in South Asia and eastern Africa, invites proposals for studies of up to 24 months duration which will add to the evidence base on nutrition-relevant policy and action in eastern Africa.

 

The challenge

Nutrition is foundational to the achievement of major social and economic goals, including many international development goals. Undernutrition in early life is responsible for 45% of under-five child deaths, reduced cognitive attainment, increased likelihood of poverty and is associated with increased maternal morbidity and mortality.

 

Child stunting rates in eastern Africa are among the highest in the world. The four countries in this call (Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda and Tanzania) are home to around 13 million stunted children, and among the highest burden countries in the world. Ensuring food and nutrition security in the region can only occur through a combination of targeted “nutrition-specific” interventions and wider “nutrition-sensitive” development interventions, backed up by enabling policy, political and institutional environments, and processes. Political commitment to address undernutrition is growing in the region (all four countries, for example, have signed up to the SUN Movement) and nutrition policies and action plans are being drawn up or revised.

 

While progress is being made, much more can be done. Scoping work within both Transform Nutrition and A4NH have clearly revealed major operational and policy-related knowledge gaps that broadly relate to the thematic focus of this call. This call for concept notes is thus intended to help fill these knowledge gaps, through locally-relevant research undertaken by research organizations from the region.

 

Click here to download the Call for Research Concept Notes.

 

This call seeks to engender a wider sense of engagement in nutrition-relevant research among national and regional stakeholders in four countries of eastern Africa: Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda and Tanzania. We seek high quality research proposals on at least one of the following research themes:

 

Theme 1: How can nutrition-specific interventions be appropriately prioritized, implemented, scaled up, and sustained in different settings?

Theme 2: How can agriculture and the wider agri-food systems become more nutrition-sensitive and have a greater impact on nutrition outcomes?

Theme 3: How can enabling (policy and institutional) environments for nutrition be cultivated and sustained?

 

Cross-cutting issues include: governance, inclusion (socio-economic and gender equity) and fragility. Gendered approaches are especially important for proposals under Theme 2.

 

Eligibility criteria and important considerations:

  • Applicants are encouraged to familiarize themselves with work underway or completed by Transform and A4NH (accessible via websites above) to maximize “value added” and complementarity with ongoing work, and avoid duplication.
  • Applicant organisations must be legally registered entities in one of the four focal countries, capable of receiving and managing funds.
  • Joint applications by more than one organization are encouraged, but one local organization must be specified as the lead.
  • An organisation may submit more than one application, and an individual may be involved in multiple proposals, but any individual may be the lead researcher on only one application.
  • Partner organizations within Transform Nutrition or A4NH may collaborate in proposed studies, but they are exempt from leading the call, and funds for their participation will need to be separately sourced.
  • Research studies may be of 6-24 months duration.
  • The requested budget for each study should lie in the range: $50,000 – $150,000. Studies that are more expensive may be considered so long as there is guaranteed co-funding to meet requirements beyond this range.
  • Each of the three themes has its own budget ceiling of $150,000.
  • It is expected that 3-6 studies (in total) will be funded through this call, with at least one study from each theme.

 

Evaluation criteria

  • quality of the concept note and proposed research
  • relevance and “value added” with regard to Transform and A4NH’s work
  • value for money
  • internal capacity (for high quality research and efficient project management)
  • clearly specified policy relevance and potential for impact

 

Format of concept notes

Please submit a concept note of no more than 3 pages (single-spaced) that clearly states:

  • problem statement (including which theme(s) the project responds to),
  • context (including what is known already),
  • objectives and research questions,
  • study design and methods to be used,
  • expected outputs, outcomes and impact,
  • lead researcher, core research team and partners (CVs not required at this stage)
  • timeframe,
  • indicative budget (with breakdowns of personnel, travel and other expenses.)

No additional material will be considered.

 

Review and selection process

The following process will be adopted:

  1. Applicant organizations are invited (through this call) to respond by 21 November 2014, and according to specified eligibility and evaluation criteria, and format, with a concept note.
  2. Concept notes will be screened against these criteria and quality filters by a review team comprising members of TN and A4NH, to select a shortlist.
  3. Shortlisted applicants will be invited to prepare detailed research proposals (by 15 January 2015)
  4. These proposals will again be reviewed by the review panel, using a standard scoring system before 30 January 2015.
  5. The winning research proposals will then be announced.
  6. Contracts will be agreed with lead organizations in February 2015.
  7. Studies will start no later than 1 March 2015.

 

Concept notes should be emailed to Sivan Yosef (IFPRI) at s.yosef@cgiar.org

All queries concerning this call should be addressed to Catherine Gee at c.gee@cgiar.org

 

*Final deadline for concept notes is 21 November 2014, (23:59 GMT).

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