evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘peer reviewed’

Famine Exposure in the Young and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Adulthood (n=7,837)

In Under-nutrition on September 28, 2012 at 9:26 am

Annet F.M. van AbeelenSjoerd G. EliasPatrick M.M. BossuytDiederick E. GrobbeeYvonne T. van der SchouwTessa J. Roseboom and Cuno S.P.M. Uiterwaal

in Diabetes. 2012 Sep;61(9):2255-60

Abstract

The developmental origins hypothesis proposes that undernutrition during early development is associated with an increased type 2 diabetes risk in adulthood.

We investigated the association between undernutrition during childhood and young adulthood and type 2 diabetes in adulthood. We studied 7,837 women from Prospect-EPIC (European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition) who were exposed to the 1944-1945 Dutch famine when they were between age 0 and 21 years. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to explore the effect of famine on the risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes in adulthood. We adjusted for potential confounders, including age at famine exposure, smoking, and level of education.

Self-reported famine exposure during childhood and young adulthood was associated with an increased type 2 diabetes risk in a dose-dependent manner. In those who reported moderate famine exposure, the age-adjusted type 2 diabetes hazard ratio (HR) was 1.36 (95% CI [1.09-1.70]); in those who reported severe famine exposure, the age-adjusted HR was 1.64 (1.26-2.14) relative to unexposed women. These effects did not change after adjustment for confounders.

This study provides the first direct evidence, using individual famine exposure data, that a short period of moderate or severe undernutrition during postnatal development increases type 2 diabetes risk in adulthood.

– – –

NB – To follow up this topic (or others), enter your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page (you can un-subscribe any time).

Effects of Ramadan fasting on cardiovascular risk factors: a prospective observational study

In Over-nutrition on September 24, 2012 at 3:47 pm

by Mohsen Nematy, Maryam Alinezhad-Namaghi, Masoud mahdavi Rashed, Mostafa Mozhdehifard, Seyedeh Sania Sajjadi, Saeed Akhlaghi, Maryam Sabery, Seyed Amir R Mohajeri, Neda Shalaey, Mohsen Moohebati and Abdolreza Norouzy

Nutrition Journal 2012, 11:69 – Published: 10 September 2012

(download the provisional entire paper)

Abstract (provisional)

Background

Previous research has shown that Ramadan fasting has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors, however there are controversies. In the present study, the effect of Ramadan fasting on cardiovascular risk factors has been investigated.

Method

This is a prospective observational study that was carried out in a group of patients with at least one cardiovascular risk factor (including history of documented previous history of either coronary artery disease (CAD), metabolic syndrome or cerebro-vascular disease in past 10 y). Eighty two volunteers including 38 male and 44 female, aged 29–70 y, mean 54.0 [PLUS-MINUS SIGN] 10 y, with a previous history of either coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome or cerebro-vascular disease were recruited. Subjects attended the metabolic unit after at least 10 h fasting, before and after Ramadan who were been fasting for at least 10 days. A fasting blood sample was obtained, blood pressure was measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Lipids profile, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and insulin, homocysteine (hcy), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and complete blood count (CBC) were analyzed on all blood samples.

Results

A significant improvement in 10 years coronary heart disease risk (based on Framingham risk score) was found (13.0 [PLUS-MINUS SIGN] 8 before Ramadan and 10.8 [PLUS-MINUS SIGN]7 after Ramadan, P <0.001, t test).There was a significant higher HDL-c, WBC, RBC and platelet count (PLT), and lower plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-c, VLDL-c, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and waist circumference after Ramadan (P <0.05, t test). The changes in FBS, insulin,Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), hcy, hs-CRP and diastolic blood pressure before and after Ramadan were not significant (P >0.05, t test).

Conclusions

This study shows a significant improvement in 10 years coronary heart disease risk score and other cardiovascular risk factors such as lipids profile, systolic blood pressure, weight, BMI and waist circumference in subjects with a previous history of cardiovascular disease.

– – –

NB – To follow up this topic (or others), enter your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page (you can un-subscribe any time)

Unexpected evidence: “Hunter-Gatherer Energetics and Human Obesity”

In Over-nutrition on September 21, 2012 at 9:31 am

Herman Pontzer, David A. Raichlen, Brian M. Wood,Audax Z. P. Mabulla, Susan B. Racette, Frank W. Marlowe

PLoS ONE 7(7) 2012 

(download the entire paper)

Abstract

Western lifestyles differ markedly from those of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, and these differences in diet and activity level are often implicated in the global obesity pandemic. However, few physiological data for hunter-gatherer populations are available to test these models of obesity.

In this study, we used the doubly-labeled water method to measure total daily energy expenditure (kCal/day) in Hadza hunter-gatherers to test whether foragers expend more energy each day than their Western counterparts.

As expected, physical activity level, PAL, was greater among Hadza foragers than among Westerners. Nonetheless, average daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners after controlling for body size. The metabolic cost of walking (kcal kg−1 m−1) and resting (kcal kg−1 s−1) were also similar among Hadza and Western groups.

The similarity in metabolic rates across a broad range of cultures challenges current models of obesity suggesting that Western lifestyles lead to decreased energy expenditure. We hypothesize that human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences.

 

Find more about obesity on this blog.

– – –

NB – To follow up this topic (or others), enter your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page (you can un-subscribe any time)

Development of a crossover-randomized trial method to determine the acceptability and safety of novel ready-to-use therapeutic foods (ahead of print)

In Under-nutrition on September 19, 2012 at 5:07 pm

by Dibari F, Bahwere P, Huerga H, Irena AH, Owino V, Collins S, Seal A.

Nutrition (article in press).

Abstract

Objective: To develop a method for determining the acceptability and safety of ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) before clinical trialing. Acceptability was defined using a combination of three consumption, nine safety, and six preference criteria. These were used to compare a soy/maize/sorghum RUTF (SMS-RUTFh), designed for the rehabilitation of human immunodeficiency virus/tuberculosis (HIV/TB) wasted adults, with a peanut-butter/milk-powder paste (P-RUTF; brand: Plumpy’nut) designed for pediatric treatment.

Methods: A cross-over, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in Kenya. Ten days of repeated measures of product intake by 41 HIV/TB patients, >18 y old, body mass index (BMI) 18-24 kg/m^2, 250 g were offered daily under direct observation as a replacement lunch meal. Consumption, comorbidity, and preferences were recorded.

Results: The study arms had similar age, sex, marital status, initial BMI, and middle upper-arm circumference. No carryover effect or serious adverse events were found. SMS-RUTFh energy intake was not statistically different from the control, when adjusted for BMI on day 1, and the presence of throat sores. General preference, taste, and sweetness scores were higher for SMS-RUTFh compared to the control (P < 0.05). Most consumption, safety, and preference criteria for SMS-RUTFh were satisfied except for the average number of days of nausea (0.16 versus 0.09 d) and vomiting (0.04 versus 0.02 d), which occurred with a higher frequency (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: SMS-RUTFh appears to be acceptable and can be safely clinically trialed, if close monitoring of vomiting and nausea is included. The method reported here is a useful and feasible approach for testing the acceptability of ready-to-use foods in low income countries.

– – –

NB – To follow up this topic (or others), enter your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page (you can un-subscribe any time)

Ready to Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF) improves undernutrition among ART-treated, HIV-positive children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

In Under-nutrition on September 1, 2012 at 3:31 pm

Bruno F Sunguya, Krishna C Poudel, Linda B Mlunde, Keiko Otsuka, Junko Yasuoka, David P Urassa, Namala P Mkopi and Masamine Jimba

Nutrition Journal 2012, 11:60 

(entire doc)

Abstract

Background

HIV/AIDS is associated with an increased burden of undernutrition among children even under antiretroviral therapy (ART). To treat undernutrition, WHO endorsed the use of Ready to Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF) that can reduce case fatality and undernutrition among ART-naive HIV-positive children. However, its effects are not studied among ART-treated, HIV-positive children. Therefore, we examined the association between RUTF use with underweight, wasting, and stunting statuses among ART-treated HIV-positive children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Methods

This cross-sectional study was conducted from September-October 2010. The target population was 219 ART-treated, HIV-positive children and the same number of their caregivers. We used questionnaires to measure socio-economic factors, food security, RUTF-use, and ART-duration. Our outcome variables were underweight, wasting, and stunting statuses.

Results

Of 219 ART-treated, HIV-positive children, 140 (63.9%) had received RUTF intervention prior to the interview. The percentages of underweight and wasting among non-RUTF-receivers were 12.4% and 16.5%; whereas those of RUTF-receivers were 3.0% (P = 0.006) and 2.8% (P = 0.001), respectively. RUTF-receivers were less likely to have underweight (Adjusted Odd Ratio (AOR) =0.19, CI: 0.04, 0.78), and wasting (AOR = 0.24, CI: 0.07, 0.81), compared to non RUTF-receivers. Among RUTF receivers, children treated for at least four months (n = 84) were less likely to have underweight (P = 0.049), wasting (P = 0.049) and stunting (P < 0.001).

Conclusions

Among HIV-positive children under ART, the provision of RUTF for at least four months was associated with low proportions of undernutrition status. RUTF has a potential to improve undernutrition among HIV-positive children under ART in the clinical settings in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

– – –

NB – To follow up this topic (or others): enter your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page (you can un-subscribe any time)

Obesity in sub-Saharan Africa: development of an ecological theoretical framework

In Over-nutrition on September 1, 2012 at 3:09 pm

Alison ScottChinwe Stella EjikemeEmmanuel Nii Clottey and Joy Goens Thomas

Health Promot. Int. (2012) – August 29, 2012

Abstract

The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). There is a need for theoretical frameworks to catalyze further research and to inform the development of multi-level, context-appropriate interventions. In this commentary, we propose a preliminary ecological theoretical framework to conceptualize factors that contribute to increases in overweight and obesity in SSA. The framework is based on a Causality Continuum model [Coreil et al. Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks] that considers distant, intermediate and proximate influences. The influences incorporated in the model include globalization and urbanization as distant factors; occupationsocial relationshipsbuilt environment andcultural perceptions of weight as intermediate factors and caloric intake, physical inactivity and genetics as proximate factors. The model illustrates the interaction of factors along a continuum, from the individual to the global marketplace, in shaping trends in overweight and obesity in SSA. The framework will be presented, each influence elucidated and implications for research and intervention development discussed. There is a tremendous need for further research on obesity in SSA. An improved evidence base will serve to validate and develop the proposed framework further.

– – –

NB – To follow up this topic (or other): type your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page. You can un-subscribe any time you wish.

Maternal Multiple Micronutrient Supplements and Child Cognition: A Randomized Trial in Indonesia

In Under-nutrition on September 1, 2012 at 7:20 am

Elizabeth L. PradoKatherine J. AlcockHusni MuadzMichael T. UllmanAnuraj H. Shankar, for the SUMMIT Study Group

Pediatrics. August 20, 2012

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relative benefit of maternal multiple micronutrient (MMN) supplementation during pregnancy and until 3 months postpartum compared with iron/folic acid supplementation on child development at preschool age (42 months).

METHODS: We assessed 487 children of mothers who participated in the Supplementation with Multiple Micronutrients Intervention Trial, a cluster-randomized trial in Indonesia, on tests adapted and validated in the local context measuring motor, language, visual attention/spatial, executive, and socioemotional abilities. Analysis was according to intention to treat.

RESULTS: In children of undernourished mothers (mid-upper arm circumference <23.5 cm), a significant benefit of MMNs was observed on motor ability (B = 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.08–0.70]; P = .015) and visual attention/spatial ability (B = 0.37 [95% CI: 0.11–0.62]; P = .004). In children of anemic mothers (hemoglobin concentration <110 g/L), a significant benefit of MMNs on visual attention/spatial ability (B = 0.24 [95% CI: 0.02–0.46]; P = .030) was also observed. No robust effects of maternal MMN supplementation were found in any developmental domain over all children.

CONCLUSIONS: When pregnant women are undernourished or anemic, provision of MMN supplements can improve the motor and cognitive abilities of their children up to 3.5 years later, particularly for both motor function and visual attention/spatial ability. Maternal MMN but not iron/folic acid supplementation protected children from the detrimental effects of maternal undernutrition on child motor and cognitive development.

– – –

NB – To follow up this topic (or other): type your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page. You can un-subscribe any time you wish.

Efficacy of a high-dose in addition to daily low-dose vitamin A in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition with other illnesses

In Under-nutrition on August 29, 2012 at 11:49 am

by Sattar SAhmed TRasul CHSaha DSalam MAHossain MI

PLoS One. 2012;7(3):e33112. Epub 2012 Mar 27

(download the entire paper)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Efficacy of high-dose vitamin A (VA) in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) has recently been questioned. This study compared the efficacy of a single high-dose (200,000 IU) in addition to daily low-dose (5000 IU) VA in the management of children suffering from SAM with diarrhea and/or acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI).

METHODS:

In a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial in icddr,b, Bangladesh during 2005-07, children aged 6-59 months with weight-for-height <-3 Z-score and/or bipedal edema (SAM) received either a high-dose VA or placebo on admission day. Both the groups received 5,000 IU/day VA in a multivitamins drop for 15 days and other standard treatment which is similar to WHO guidelines.

RESULTS:

A total 260 children (130 in each group) were enrolled. All had diarrhea, 54% had concomitant ALRI, 50% had edema, 48.5% were girl with a mean±SD age of 16±10 months. None had clinical signs of VA deficiency. Mean±SD baseline serum retinol was 13.15±9.28 µg/dl, retinol binding protein was 1.27±0.95 mg/dl, and pre-albumin was 7.97±3.96 mg/dl. Median (inter quartile range) of C-reactive protein was 7.8 (2.1, 22.2) mg/L. Children of the two groups did not differ in any baseline characteristic. Over the 15 days treatment period resolution of diarrhea, ALRI, edema, anthropometric changes, and biochemical indicators of VA were similar between the groups. The high-dose VA supplementation in children with SAM did not show any adverse event.

CONCLUSIONS:

Efficacy of daily low-dose VA compared to an additional single high-dose was not observed to be better in the management of children suffering from SAM with other acute illnesses. A single high-dose VA may be given especially where the children with SAM may leave the hospital/treatment center early.

– – –

NB: You wish to follow up this or other topics from this blog? Type your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page.

An evaluation of an operations research project to reduce childhood stunting in a food-insecure area in Ethiopia

In Under-nutrition on August 28, 2012 at 8:52 pm

by Bridget Fenn, Assaye T Bulti, Themba Nduna, Arabella Duffield and Fiona Watson

Public Health Nutrition / Volume 15 / Issue 09 / September 2012 , pp 1746-1754

Abstract

Objective To determine which interventions can reduce linear growth retardation (stunting) in children aged 6–36 months over a 5-year period in a food-insecure population in Ethiopia.

Design We used data collected through an operations research project run by Save the Children UK: the Child Caring Practices (CCP) project. Eleven neighbouring villages were purposefully selected to receive one of four interventions: (i) health; (iii) nutrition education; (iii) water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); or (iv) integrated comprising all interventions. A comparison group of three villages did not receive any interventions. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted at baseline (2004) and for impact evaluation (2009) using the same quantitative and qualitative tools. The primary outcome was stunted growth in children aged 6–36 months measured as height (or length)-for-age Z-scores (mean and prevalence). Secondary outcomes were knowledge of health seeking, infant and young child feeding and preventive practices.

Setting Amhara, Ethiopia.

Subjects Children aged 6–36 months.

Results The WASH intervention group was the only group to show a significant increase in mean height-for-age Z-score (+0·33, P = 0·02), with a 12·1 % decrease in the prevalence of stunting, compared with the baseline group. This group also showed significant improvements in mothers’ knowledge of causes of diarrhoea and hygiene practices. The other intervention groups saw non-significant impacts for childhood stunting but improvements in knowledge relating to specific intervention education messages given.

Conclusions The study suggests that an improvement in hygiene practices had a significant impact on stunting levels. However, there may be alternative explanations for this and further evidence is required.

– – –

NB: You wish to follow up this or other topics from this blog? Type your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page.

An effectiveness trial showed lipid-based nutrient supplementation but not corn–soya blend offered a modest benefit in weight gain among 6- to 18-month-old underweight children in rural Malawi

In Under-nutrition on August 28, 2012 at 8:44 pm

by Chrissie M Thakwalakwa, Per Ashorn, Mpumulo Jawati, John C Phuka, Yin Bun Cheung and Kenneth M Maleta

Public Health Nutrition / Volume 15 / Issue 09 / September 2012 , pp 1755-1762

Abstract

 Objective To determine if supplementation with corn–soya blend (CSB) or lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) improved the weight gain of moderately underweight infants and children when provided through the national health service.

Design A randomised, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial. Infants and children were randomised to receive for 12 weeks an average daily ration of 71 g CSB or 43 g LNS, providing 1188 kJ and 920 kJ, respectively, or no supplement (control). Main outcome was weight gain. Secondary outcomes included changes in anthropometric indices and incidence of serious adverse events. Intention-to-treat analyses were used.

Setting Kukalanga, Koche, Katema and Jalasi health centres in Mangochi District, rural Malawi.

Subjects Underweight (weight-for-age Z-score <−2) infants and children aged 6–15 months (n 299).

Results Mean weight gain was 630 g, 680 g and 750 g in control, CSB and LNS groups, respectively (P = 0·21). When adjusted for baseline age, children receiving LNS gained on average 90 g more weight (P = 0·185) and their weight-for-length Z-score increased 0·22 more (P = 0·049) compared with those receiving no supplementation. No statistically significant differences were observed between the CSB and control groups in mean weight and length gain.

Conclusions LNS supplementation provided during the lean season via through the national health service was associated with a modest increase in weight. However, the effect size was lower than that previously reported under more controlled research settings.

– – –

NB: You wish to follow up this or other topics from this blog? Type your email in the rectangle at the bottom/right side of this page.

%d bloggers like this: