evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘policy development’

Training: 4th Annual Summer Institute for systematic reviews in nutrition for global policy-making

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on March 17, 2017 at 3:14 pm
 

4th Annual Summer Institute for systematic reviews in nutrition for
global policy-making

 

World Health Organization (WHO)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Collaborating Centre on implementation research in nutrition and global policy and Cochrane

Date: 24 July to 4 August 2017
Venue: Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University Campus, Ithaca, NY, United States of America

Scope and purpose

The World Health Organization (WHO) follows a guideline development process, described in detail in the
WHO Handbook for Guideline Development (2nd edition), overseen by the Guidelines Review Committee (GRC) established by the Director-General in 2007. The WHO Guidelines Review Committee ensures that WHO guidelines are of a high methodological quality, developed using a transparent and explicit process, and are informed on high quality systematic reviews of the evidence using state-of–the art systematic search strategies, synthesis, quality assessments and methods.

The WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development has worked with the Cochrane editorial office and various groups within the Cochrane to produce systematic reviews for WHO nutrition guidelines since 2010. This allows for faster and prioritized completion of systematic reviews on the effects of interventions that contribute towards guideline development.

Cochrane is an international network of more than 28 000 people from over 120 countries working together to help health-care providers, policy-makers, and patients, their advocates and carers, make well-informed decisions about health care. This collaboration hosts the Cochrane Library and CENTRAL, the largest collection of records of randomized controlled trials in the world. On 24 January 2011, WHO awarded Cochrane a seat on the World Health Assembly, allowing the collaboration to provide input on WHO health resolutions.

In order to further increase capacity in systematic review methodology among nutrition scientists and practitioners, the WHO/PAHO Collaborating Centre on implementation research in nutrition and global policy, in collaboration with Cochrane has convened the Summer Institute for systematic reviews in nutrition for global policy-making in Ithaca, NY, United States of America since 2014. The 4th Annual Summer Institute will be held on 24 July to 4 August 2017.

This unique institute will bring together experts from WHO, PAHO, Cochrane, and Cornell University to train participants in the development of systematic reviews of nutrition interventions in public health following the Cochrane methodology. Participants will use the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) tool to assess the overall quality of evidence.

The WHO/Cochrane/Cornell University Summer Institute for systematic reviews in nutrition for global policy-making is intended for nutrition scientists and practitioners from various fields with interest in the application of scientific evidence in policy making. Applications from women and from nationals of low- and middle-income countries are particularly encouraged. Partial financial support is available for limited number of accepted participants.

The objectives of this programme are:

• To update and develop technical skills and knowledge in systematic reviews of nutrition and nutrition-sensitive interventions;
• To build understanding of the process for global policy making in nutrition, and evidence assessment and its challenges;
• To complete hands-on training in the development of Cochrane systematic reviews on a topic of immediate global health relevance in nutrition and public health.

For additional information, please see the Summer Institute website (here). To apply, please submit your application materials to DNSDirector@cornell.edu at your earliest convenience. The Institute will process applications as they are received, therefore on a rolling basis, and will close the class when the limit of participants is reached. Once accepted, participants will receive a link with additional information for registration.

For further information and specific application instructions, visit this link: http://who-cochrane-cornell-summer-institute.nutrition.cornell.edu/

 

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Diet and physical activity for the prevention of noncommunicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic policy review

In Over-nutrition on June 2, 2014 at 1:09 pm

by Lachat C, Otchere S, Roberfroid D, Abdulai A, Seret FM, Milesevic J, Xuereb G, Candeias V, Kolsteren P

PLoS Med. 2013;10(6):e1001465

(download the paper here)

 

Abstract

 

BACKGROUND:

Diet-related noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing rapidly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and constitute a leading cause of mortality.

Although a call for global action has been resonating for years, the progress in national policy development in LMICs has not been assessed. This review of strategies to prevent NCDs in LMICs provides a benchmark against which policy response can be tracked over time.

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

We reviewed how government policies in LMICs outline actions that address salt consumption, fat consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, or physical activity. A structured content analysis of national nutrition, NCDs, and health policies published between 1 January 2004 and 1 January 2013 by 140 LMIC members of the World Health Organization (WHO) was carried out.

We assessed availability of policies in 83% (116/140) of the countries. NCD strategies were found in 47% (54/116) of LMICs reviewed, but only a minority proposed actions to promote healthier diets and physical activity.
The coverage of policies that specifically targeted at least one of the risk factors reviewed was lower in Africa, Europe, the Americas, and the Eastern Mediterranean compared to the other two World Health Organization regions, South-East Asia and Western Pacific. Of the countries reviewed, only 12% (14/116) proposed a policy that addressed all four risk factors, and 25% (29/116) addressed only one of the risk factors reviewed. Strategies targeting the private sector were less frequently encountered than strategies targeting the general public or policy makers.

CONCLUSIONS:

This review indicates the disconnection between the burden of NCDs and national policy responses in LMICs. Policy makers urgently need to develop comprehensive and multi-stakeholder policies to improve dietary quality and physical activity.

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