evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘RUSF’

Development, acceptability, and nutritional characteristics of a low-cost, shelf-stable supplementary food product for vulnerable groups in Kenya

In Uncategorized, Under-nutrition on October 15, 2012 at 8:14 am

 Kunyanga, Catherine; Imungi, Jasper; Okoth, Michael; Vadivel, Vellingiri; Biesalski, Hans Konrad

Food & Nutrition Bulletin, Volume 33, Number 1, March 2012 , pp. 43-52(10)

Abstract:

Background. Food-based approaches have been advocated as the best strategies to curb hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. The use of low-cost, locally available, nutritious foods in the development of supplementary foods has been recommended.

 Objective. To develop low-cost food supplements using different traditionally processed local foods, consisting of cereals, legumes, nuts, fish, and vegetables, to meet the nutrient requirements for vulnerable groups in Kenya.

 Methods. Four food supplements were developed and evaluated by taste panel procedures. The product containing amaranth grain, pigeon pea, sweet potato, groundnuts, and brown sugar was found to be the most acceptable supplement. Evaluation of nutritional composition, shelf-life, and cost analysis of the acceptable supplement was carried out to assess if it could satisfactorily provide more than 50% of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) of the basic nutrients for vulnerable groups.

 Results. The acceptable supplement contained 453.2 kcal energy, 12.7 g crude protein, 54.3 g soluble carbohydrates, 20.8 g crude fat, and 10.1 g crude fiber per 110 g. The micronutrient contents were 93.0 mg calcium, 172.4 mg magnesium, 2.7 mg zinc, 5.7 mg iron, 0.8 mg vitamin B1, 0.2 mg vitamin B2, 7.9 mg niacin, 100 μg folic acid, and 140 μg retinol equivalent per 110 g. The supplement also contained 21% total essential amino acid in addition to appreciable levels of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic fatty acids. The shelf-life study showed that it could be stored in different packaging materials (polythene bags, gunny bags, and kraft paper) at 26°C without deleterious effects on its chemical composition for up to 4 months. Cost analysis of the supplement indicated that the product could be competitively sold at US$0.812/kg (KES 65.50/kg).

 Conclusions. Locally available indigenous foods can be used in the formulation of acceptable, low-cost, shelf-stable, nutritious supplementary foods for vulnerable groups.

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WHO: Supplementary foods for the management of moderate acute malnutrition

In Under-nutrition on October 12, 2012 at 12:34 pm

Original title: Supplementary foods  for the management of moderate acute malnutrition in infants and children 6–59 months of age (Technical note)

by WHO (2012)

(download here a brief version of the document)

This document proposes the nutrient composition of supplementary foods to manage moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) in children under 5 years of age.

Experimental data were used to inform the estimates, taking into consideration the effect of different levels of nutrients and their bio-availability.

The document also lists the principles of nutritional management of children with MAM and reports the assumptions considered to set up the proposed recommendations, suggesting  which uses the latter can be applied for and topics for further research in this area.

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The Effect of Adding Ready-to-Use Supplementary Food to a General Food Distribution on Child Nutritional Status and Morbidity: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

In Under-nutrition on October 10, 2012 at 3:07 pm

by Lieven Huybregts, Freddy Houngbe´, Cecile Salpeteur, Rebecca Brown, Dominique Roberfroid, Myriam Ait-Aissa, Patrick Kolsteren

PLoS Med. 2012 Sep;9(9)

(download the entire paper)

Abstract

Background

Recently, operational organizations active in child nutrition in developing countries have suggested that blanket feeding strategies be adopted to enable the prevention of child wasting. A new range of nutritional supplements is now available, with claims that they can prevent wasting in populations at risk of periodic food shortages. Evidence is lacking as to the effectiveness of such preventive interventions. This study examined the effect of a ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF) on the prevention of wasting in 6- to 36-mo-old children within the framework of a general
food distribution program.

Methods and Findings

We conducted a two-arm cluster-randomized controlled pragmatic intervention study in a sample of 1,038 children aged 6 to 36 mo in the city of Abeche, Chad. Both arms were included in a general food distribution program providing staple foods. The intervention group was given a daily 46 g of RUSF for 4 mo. Anthropometric measurements and morbidity were recorded monthly. Adding RUSF to a package of monthly household food rations for
households containing a child assigned to the intervention group did not result in a reduction in cumulative incidence of wasting (incidence risk ratio: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.67, 1.11; p = 0.25). However, the intervention group had a modestly higher gain in height-for-age (+0.03 Z-score/mo; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.04; p,0.001). In addition, children in the intervention group had a significantly higher hemoglobin concentration at the end of the study than children in the control group (+3.8 g/l; 95% CI:0.6, 7.0; p = 0.02), thereby reducing the odds of anemia (odds ratio: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.82; p = 0.004). Adding RUSF also resulted in a significantly lower risk of self-reported diarrhea (229.3%; 95% CI: 20.5, 37.2; p,0.001) and fever episodes (222.5%; 95% CI: 14.0, 30.2; p,0.001). Limitations of this study include that the projected sample size was not fully attained and that significantly fewer children from the control group were present at follow-up sessions.

Conclusions

Providing RUSF as part of a general food distribution resulted in improvements in hemoglobin status and small improvements in linear growth, accompanied by an apparent reduction in morbidity.

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An effectiveness trial showed lipid-based nutrient supplementation but not corn–soya blend offered a modest benefit in weight gain among 6- to 18-month-old underweight children in rural Malawi

In Under-nutrition on August 28, 2012 at 8:44 pm

by Chrissie M Thakwalakwa, Per Ashorn, Mpumulo Jawati, John C Phuka, Yin Bun Cheung and Kenneth M Maleta

Public Health Nutrition / Volume 15 / Issue 09 / September 2012 , pp 1755-1762

Abstract

 Objective To determine if supplementation with corn–soya blend (CSB) or lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) improved the weight gain of moderately underweight infants and children when provided through the national health service.

Design A randomised, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial. Infants and children were randomised to receive for 12 weeks an average daily ration of 71 g CSB or 43 g LNS, providing 1188 kJ and 920 kJ, respectively, or no supplement (control). Main outcome was weight gain. Secondary outcomes included changes in anthropometric indices and incidence of serious adverse events. Intention-to-treat analyses were used.

Setting Kukalanga, Koche, Katema and Jalasi health centres in Mangochi District, rural Malawi.

Subjects Underweight (weight-for-age Z-score <−2) infants and children aged 6–15 months (n 299).

Results Mean weight gain was 630 g, 680 g and 750 g in control, CSB and LNS groups, respectively (P = 0·21). When adjusted for baseline age, children receiving LNS gained on average 90 g more weight (P = 0·185) and their weight-for-length Z-score increased 0·22 more (P = 0·049) compared with those receiving no supplementation. No statistically significant differences were observed between the CSB and control groups in mean weight and length gain.

Conclusions LNS supplementation provided during the lean season via through the national health service was associated with a modest increase in weight. However, the effect size was lower than that previously reported under more controlled research settings.

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Save the Children (NGO) about treatment of Acute Malnutrition: Minimum Reporting Package User Guidelines

In Under-nutrition on August 21, 2012 at 10:46 am

(download the entire doc)

“These minimum Reporting Package (MRP) User Guidelines are intended to outline the definitions, reporting categories and performance indicators for monitoring and reporting on three feeding programmes using the MRP software.

“The programmes are: targeted Supplementary Feeding Programmes (SFPs), Outpatient Therapeutic Programmes (OTPs) and Stabilisation Centres (SCs).

“There is also guidance on interpreting and taking action on programme performance indicators.

“The audience for the guidelines are nutrition programme coordinators and M&E staff of NGOs involved in the monitoring and reporting process.”

On this blog you can find more information about management of acute malnutrition, and ready to use foods for undernutrition treatment.
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Context-specific choice of food aid items (USAID)

In Under-nutrition on August 12, 2012 at 10:22 am


(click directly on the flowchart for an enlarged view)

In a recent document (2011), USAID, in collaboration with the UN Global Nutrition Cluster, UNHCR WFP and other organizations, suggest which type of programme and food commodities are more adequate.

However, it was concluded that there is no one food product that can meet every kind of programming goal, and no one programming approach that fits all needs.

The same panel  developed decision trees and few flow charts to help policy makers and donors in taking more informed decisions about programmes and choice of food-products.

The original program guidance is available here, whereas another version of the same, visible above, was adjusted in one chapter of my PhD thesis.

Finally! Everything, really everything, about treatment of undernutrition (CMAM). In just-one-click-away, comprehensive, interactive, open-access, website.

In Under-nutrition on July 10, 2012 at 10:42 am

A new electronic forum improves the management of acute malnutrition. Worldwide.

In this area of humanitarian intervention, CMAM is the acronym mostly used: Community-based Management of Acute Malnutrition.

The CMAM forum not only hosts e-discussions about this topic, but also collects all the key documents endorsed by the WHO, other UN agencies, national and international NGOs. Otherwise scattered around, in their web sites.

World experts in this field (Andre’ Briend, and Mark Myatt among them) support this forum. Therefore, the target consists of practitioners rather than the general public.

The main focus list of the e-forum includes:

  • malnutrition and HIV/AIDS
  • malnutrition and infants, children, adolescents and adults, whose specificities are treated separately
  • malnutrition and health systems in the individual countries
  • evidence for action aiming policy-making, advocacy, support in the area of malnutrition treatment
  • product development for malnutrition rehabilitation
  • current research and existing evidences about most of the topics mentioned above
The web site has important tools:
  • you are interested in CMAM in a specific country? Visit the country section of the CMAM web forum
  • you wish to receive notices about meetings, conferences, trainings? You want to ask questions, learn how to calculate case loads, or simply follow up other people’s questions? Create your website account (for free)
  • you are interested in the latest evidence-based documents or the current state of research? Visit the related section of the forum
  • you can also contribute sharing, with the other forum members, the lessons learnt from your community-based feeding programme

This important forum was conceived thanks to the effort of many organizations. However, the realization was led by Valid International and Action Against Hunger.

If you find the CMAM forum interesting, do not hesitate to re-blog this post, or forward the link of the forum to relevant people.

If you have some constructive criticism or ideas to improve this new important tool, I encourage you to contact its coordinators: Nicky Dent and Rebecca Brown (contacts): I promise that they will be extremely happy to hear from you…

WFP: foods and food supplements for preventing and treating malnutrition in children

In Under-nutrition on June 4, 2012 at 2:23 pm

Original title: “Current and potential role of   specially formulated foods and food supplements for   preventing malnutrition among 6-23 months old and   treating moderate malnutrition among 6-59 months old children”

by Saskia de Pee and Martin W Bloem (2008) – WFP

(download)

Abstract

Reducing child malnutrition requires nutritious food, breastfeeding, improved hygiene, health services, and (prenatal) care. Poverty and food insecurity seriously constrain accessibility of nutritious diets, including high protein quality, adequate micronutrient content and bioavailability, macro-minerals and essential fatty acids, low anti-nutrient content, and high nutrient density. Largely plant-source-based diets with few animal source and fortified foods do not meet these requirements and need to be improved by processing (dehulling, germinating, fermenting), fortification, and adding animal source foods, e.g. milk, or other specific nutrients. Options include using specially formulated foods: fortified blended foods (FBFs), commercial infant cereals, ready-to-use foods i.e. pastes/compressed bars/biscuits, or complementary food supplements (CFS): micronutrient powders (MNP); powdered CFS containing (micro)nutrients, protein, amino acids and/or enzymes; or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS), 120-500 kcal/d, typically containing milk powder, high-quality vegetable oil, peanut-paste, sugar, (micro)nutrients. Most supplementary feeding programs for moderately malnourished children supply FBFs, such as corn soy blend, with oil and sugar, which has shortcomings: too many anti-nutrients, no milk (important for growth), suboptimal micronutrient content, high bulk and viscosity. Thus, for feeding young or malnourished children, FBFs need to be improved or replaced. Based on success with ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) for treating severe acute malnutrition, modifying that recipe is also considered. Commodities for reducing child malnutrition should be chosen based on nutritional needs, program circumstances, availability of commodities, and likelihood of impact. Data are urgently required to compare impact of new or modified commodities to current (FBFs) and to RUTF developed for treating severe acute malnutrition.

Nutritional support for African adults starting antiretroviral therapy (NUSTART) – a clinical trial

In Under-nutrition on May 5, 2012 at 2:37 pm

Background of the Trial. Micronutrient deficiencies and altered mineral metabolism associated with wasting malnutrition are potential risk factors for death among African patients referred for anti‐retroviral therapy (ART). We will conduct a randomized controlled phase III trial of a lipid‐based nutrient supplement (LNS)* without or with vitamins and bulk minerals during the first weeks after referral for ART.

* Also known as lipid-based, ready-to-use food for nutrition rehabilitation.

“A number of important universities is conducting an interesting randomized controlled clinical trial to test a lipid-base, ready-to-use food in adults, ART naive, with BMI < 18.5 kg/m2, requiring ART as determined by CD4 count < 350/l. The primary outcome consists of survival from the time of referral for ART to 12 weeks after starting ART, whereas the secondary outcomes are hospitalization from referral for ART to 12 weeks after starting ART, gain in lean body mass, and change in serum phosphate.

“All participants will receive a stepped regimen of LNS: this comprises a small daily dose of LNS (SDLNS) containing limited calories, from time of referral for ART through the pre‐ART preparation phase and until 2 weeks after start of ART, and then a larger daily dose of LNS containing a greater calorie provision (LD‐LNS) for four weeks, i.e., from 2 to 6 weeks after start of ART.

“The investigators are: Professor Suzanne Filteau (principal investigator), London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Professor Henrik Friis, University of Copenhagen; Dr Paul Kelly, Barts & The London School of Medicine and University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka; Dr Lackson Kasonka, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka; Mr John Changalucha, Mwanza Medical Research Centre, Tanzania; Dr. Tsinuel Girma. Jimma University Specialised Hospital, Ethiopia; Dr. Douglas Heimburger, Vanderbilt University, USA; Dr. Aase Bengaard Andersen, University of Odense, Denmark; Dr. John Koethe, Vanderbilt University, USA.”

More informations are available on this document.

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