evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘SUN movement’

(Free) COURSE: Do you work within the Scaling Up Nutrition Business network? Do you need a crash course on Public/Private Partnerships? World Bank and Coursera have a course on PPP projects (4 wks, online)

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on July 22, 2015 at 8:48 am

Capturefrom Coursera web site

Public-Private Partnerships (PPP): How can PPPs help deliver better services?

Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) are one tool that governments can employ to help deliver needed infrastructure services. PPPs are a way of contracting for services, using private sector innovation and expertise, and they often leverage private finance. PPPs can, implemented under the right circumstances, improve service provision and facilitate economic growth.

Course tracks

Participants can participate in one of two tracks:

  • Track 1: PPP Awareness (2 hours/week).
  • Track 2: Policy and Practice (3-4 hours/week).

Course Format

This MOOC has a week-by-week structure, with resources, activities and exercises for you to engage in during each of the four weeks of the course. Each week, you will find a variety of course material, including:

    • Videos on key topics by renowned practitioners and academics.
    • Resources: Core and optional (deep dive) on the week’s theme.
    • Quizzes that check your knowledge, reinforce the lesson’s material and provide immediate feedback.
    • Assignments that will sharpen your skills of analysis, reflection and communication.
    • Discussion forums and social media that enable collaboration with others from around the world, enriching interaction among participants.
    • A live interactive Google Hangouts on Air with international experts, who will engage in a Q&A session on PPPs.
    • As a final project for the Policy and Practice track, you will create a digital artifact.

Suggested readings

›   Farquharson, Edward, Clemencia Torres de Mästle, E. R. Yescombe, and Javier     Encinas. How to Engage with the Private Sector in Public-Private Partnerships in     Emerging Markets. Washington, D.C., USA: The International Bank for     Reconstruction and Development, 2011.

›   International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, The World Bank, Asian     Development Bank, and Inter-American Development Bank. Public-Private Partnerships Reference Guide. 2nd ed. Washington, D.C, USA: The World Bank,     n.d.

A new UN body to combat global malnutrition?

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on October 15, 2014 at 10:22 am

By Elena L. Pasquini 14 October 2014

from Devex web site

 

The United Nations is considering setting up a new body to address global malnutrition as early as next month, Devex has learned.

Tentatively called “U.N. Nutrition,” the new entity will be headed by UNICEF and the World Food Program, according to well-placed sources within civil society groups attending this week’s Committee on World Food Security, or CFS, in Rome. Over the weekend, the sources also participated in working groups ahead of the second International Conference on Nutrition — known as ICN2 — jointly led by FAO and the World Health Organization in November.

During the informal talks, the rumor circulated among attendees, Stefano Prato, managing director of the Society for International Development, told Devex in Rome.

“We had confirmation from U.N. insiders [and] also from delegates that there is a concrete plan,” he said.

Civil society groups believe the model for U.N. Nutrition could be Scaling Up Nutrition, a country-led global platform that seeks to unite governments, civil society, U.N. agencies, donors, businesses and researchers in a collective effort to improve nutrition through specific interventions — including support for breastfeeding and nutrition-sensitive approaches in areas such as agriculture or WASH.

“We are [also] quite sure that it will be based on PPPs, integrating governments and the private sector,” Prato added.

U.N. Nutrition could be launched a month from now in ICN2, and civil society organizations hope more details will emerge publicly this week so the plans are “disclosed with transparency” and CSOs are allowed to give feedback on whether “it’s the right answer to malnutrition, or if there are other [solutions].”

UN Nutrition vs. CFS

On Monday, the first session of the CFS was abuzz with gossip over the rumored new agency and how it will complement the current intergovernmental body and multistakeholder platform based in Rome.

For CSOs, the first question was which organization should take the lead in the fight against global malnutrition.

“Nutrition is not a problem of delivering, it is an issue of policies,” Prato said. “We believe the nutrition question has to be addressed through [shared] rules and regulations. That’s why we suggest a strong role for CFS.”

According to the SID official, the involvement of UNICEF and WFP says something about the direction the initiative is taking: “WFP and UNICEF are not organizations where there is a sovereign assembly, such as the FAO or WHO … programs [are] driven by donors and with also a quite restricted range of donors … It is not a context of democratic dialogue and those are not spaces for [defining] policy.”

Civil society, he insisted, wants malnutrition programs to be driven by policies rather than by donors or private sector interests.

“We don’t want this role bypassed by programs defined by donors without mechanisms of consultation and control,” Prato said. “What we fear is the establishment of mechanisms that are not legitimate and not accountable.”

In this scenario, a leading role for the private sector raise further concerns for CSOs, which believe strengthening local food systems based on the diversity of agricultural systems is the key to addressing malnutrition, instead of solutions based on delivery of products, fortification, dietary supplements or processed food.

“Clearly, big multinational corporations … are very much interested [in] that … approach,” Prato said. “What we fear is the participation of the private sector without clear rules of engagement and therefore [leading to] a conflict of interest.”

ICN2, a weak step forward?

The plans for a new U.N. body focused on nutrition is part a process that it is expected to reach its high watermark at the ICN2 in November, when FAO and WHO member states are expected to endorse Sunday’s consensus on a political declaration and framework for action to fight global malnutrition.

But according to Prato, the political declaration is “extremely weak,” as it doesn’t include tangible commitments or provide any timeframe for implementation. Moreover, the framework for action is nonbinding and there is “nothing new” in its concept.

“There is a dilution of the [centrality] of the right to food … the importance of local food systems is mentioned, but very poorly,” he said. “Above all, there are … no obligations … no control and accountability mechanisms … In short, it is fundamentally a big set of words.”

Prato would rather U.N. Nutrition stay within the framework of CFS. The SID official insisted CFS must comply with its mandate to properly address the problem of global malnutrition and argued its role should be strengthened ahead of ICN2.

Is a new U.N. body the solution to combat malnutrition? And how will it complement the current multistakeholder platform based in Rome? Please let us know your thoughts by sending an email to news@devex.com or leaving a comment below.

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CGIAR: Call for concept notes: nutrition-relevant policy and action in eastern Africa

In Under-nutrition on October 7, 2014 at 7:37 am

from CGIAR web pageOctober 3, 2014 by

The Transform Nutrition Research Consortium, a network which seeks to transform thinking and action on nutrition among research, operational, and policy communities in South Asia and eastern Africa, invites proposals for studies of up to 24 months duration which will add to the evidence base on nutrition-relevant policy and action in eastern Africa.

 

The challenge

Nutrition is foundational to the achievement of major social and economic goals, including many international development goals. Undernutrition in early life is responsible for 45% of under-five child deaths, reduced cognitive attainment, increased likelihood of poverty and is associated with increased maternal morbidity and mortality.

 

Child stunting rates in eastern Africa are among the highest in the world. The four countries in this call (Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda and Tanzania) are home to around 13 million stunted children, and among the highest burden countries in the world. Ensuring food and nutrition security in the region can only occur through a combination of targeted “nutrition-specific” interventions and wider “nutrition-sensitive” development interventions, backed up by enabling policy, political and institutional environments, and processes. Political commitment to address undernutrition is growing in the region (all four countries, for example, have signed up to the SUN Movement) and nutrition policies and action plans are being drawn up or revised.

 

While progress is being made, much more can be done. Scoping work within both Transform Nutrition and A4NH have clearly revealed major operational and policy-related knowledge gaps that broadly relate to the thematic focus of this call. This call for concept notes is thus intended to help fill these knowledge gaps, through locally-relevant research undertaken by research organizations from the region.

 

Click here to download the Call for Research Concept Notes.

 

This call seeks to engender a wider sense of engagement in nutrition-relevant research among national and regional stakeholders in four countries of eastern Africa: Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda and Tanzania. We seek high quality research proposals on at least one of the following research themes:

 

Theme 1: How can nutrition-specific interventions be appropriately prioritized, implemented, scaled up, and sustained in different settings?

Theme 2: How can agriculture and the wider agri-food systems become more nutrition-sensitive and have a greater impact on nutrition outcomes?

Theme 3: How can enabling (policy and institutional) environments for nutrition be cultivated and sustained?

 

Cross-cutting issues include: governance, inclusion (socio-economic and gender equity) and fragility. Gendered approaches are especially important for proposals under Theme 2.

 

Eligibility criteria and important considerations:

  • Applicants are encouraged to familiarize themselves with work underway or completed by Transform and A4NH (accessible via websites above) to maximize “value added” and complementarity with ongoing work, and avoid duplication.
  • Applicant organisations must be legally registered entities in one of the four focal countries, capable of receiving and managing funds.
  • Joint applications by more than one organization are encouraged, but one local organization must be specified as the lead.
  • An organisation may submit more than one application, and an individual may be involved in multiple proposals, but any individual may be the lead researcher on only one application.
  • Partner organizations within Transform Nutrition or A4NH may collaborate in proposed studies, but they are exempt from leading the call, and funds for their participation will need to be separately sourced.
  • Research studies may be of 6-24 months duration.
  • The requested budget for each study should lie in the range: $50,000 – $150,000. Studies that are more expensive may be considered so long as there is guaranteed co-funding to meet requirements beyond this range.
  • Each of the three themes has its own budget ceiling of $150,000.
  • It is expected that 3-6 studies (in total) will be funded through this call, with at least one study from each theme.

 

Evaluation criteria

  • quality of the concept note and proposed research
  • relevance and “value added” with regard to Transform and A4NH’s work
  • value for money
  • internal capacity (for high quality research and efficient project management)
  • clearly specified policy relevance and potential for impact

 

Format of concept notes

Please submit a concept note of no more than 3 pages (single-spaced) that clearly states:

  • problem statement (including which theme(s) the project responds to),
  • context (including what is known already),
  • objectives and research questions,
  • study design and methods to be used,
  • expected outputs, outcomes and impact,
  • lead researcher, core research team and partners (CVs not required at this stage)
  • timeframe,
  • indicative budget (with breakdowns of personnel, travel and other expenses.)

No additional material will be considered.

 

Review and selection process

The following process will be adopted:

  1. Applicant organizations are invited (through this call) to respond by 21 November 2014, and according to specified eligibility and evaluation criteria, and format, with a concept note.
  2. Concept notes will be screened against these criteria and quality filters by a review team comprising members of TN and A4NH, to select a shortlist.
  3. Shortlisted applicants will be invited to prepare detailed research proposals (by 15 January 2015)
  4. These proposals will again be reviewed by the review panel, using a standard scoring system before 30 January 2015.
  5. The winning research proposals will then be announced.
  6. Contracts will be agreed with lead organizations in February 2015.
  7. Studies will start no later than 1 March 2015.

 

Concept notes should be emailed to Sivan Yosef (IFPRI) at s.yosef@cgiar.org

All queries concerning this call should be addressed to Catherine Gee at c.gee@cgiar.org

 

*Final deadline for concept notes is 21 November 2014, (23:59 GMT).

PROFILES: A Data Based Approach to Nutrition Advocacy and National Development

In Under-nutrition on December 15, 2013 at 9:20 am

 

From Fanta III website

“PROFILES is an evidence-based advocacy tool to support increased political and social commitment to nutrition. PROFILES uses computer models and up-to-date country-specific data to project, over a defined period of time, the consequences that malnutrition will have on national development. It estimates the cost savings that reducing malnutrition will have over that time period in terms of lives improved and saved, and the economic losses averted. Those estimates are then used to engage country governments and other high-level stakeholders in a collaborative process to identity and prioritize actions to reduce malnutrition. Such actions may include developing or refining policies, more effectively implementing existing policies, identifying priority geographic areas in which selected interventions should be focused, and scaling up interventions.”

More info and documents are available on fhi360 website:

Pdf Profiles – A Data Based Approach to Nutrition Advocacy (Front Matter) (782 kb)

Pdf Profiles – A Data Based Approach to Nutrition Advocacy (Pages 1 – 10) (1 mb)

Pdf Profiles – A Data Based Approach to Nutrition Advocacy (Pages 11 – 20) (6 mb)

Pdf Profiles – A Data Based Approach to Nutrition Advocacy (Pages 21-30) (2 mb)

Pdf Profiles – A Data Based Approach to Nutrition Advocacy (Pages 41-50) (3 mb)

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