evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘supplementary feeding’

A Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplement but Not Corn-Soy Blend Modestly Increases Weight Gain among 6- to 18-Month-Old Moderately Underweight Children in Rural Malawi

In Under-nutrition on April 19, 2014 at 9:07 am

by Thakwalakwa C, Ashorn P, Phuka J, Cheung YB, Briend A, Puumalainen T, Maleta K.

J. Nutr. November 1, 2010 vol. 140 no. 11 2008-2013

(download)

Abstract

Although widely used, there is little information concerning the efficacy of corn-soy blend (CSB) supplementation in the treatment of moderate underweight in African children. Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS), which have proven to be beneficial treatment for severely wasted children, could offer benefits to less severely affected individuals.

We conducted a clinical randomized trial to determine whether LNS or CSB supplementation improves weight gain of moderately underweight children. A total of 182 underweight [weight-for-age Z-score (WAZ) < −2] 6- to 15-mo-old children were randomized to receive for 12 wk a ration of 43 g/d LNS or 71 g/d CSB, providing 1189 and 921 kJ, respectively, or no supplementation (control). The primary outcome was weight change; secondary outcomes included changes in anthropometric indices, hemoglobin levels, and morbidity.

The body weight increases (mean ± SD) did not differ and were 620 ± 470, 510 ± 350, and 470 ± 350 g in the LNS, CSB, and control groups, respectively (P = 0.11). Compared with controls, infants and children in the LNS group gained more weight [mean (95% CI) = 150 g (0–300 g); P = 0.05] and had a greater increase in WAZ [0.33 (−0.02–0.65); P = 0.04]. Weight and WAZ changes did not differ between the control and CSB groups. In exploratory stratified analysis, the weight increase was higher in the LNS group compared with the control group among those with lower initial WAZ [250 g (60–430 g; P = 0.01].

Supplementation with LNS but not CSB modestly increases weight gain among moderately underweight children and the effect appears most pronounced among those with a lower initial WAZ.

 

 

FORMULATION OF SORGHUM-PEANUT BLEND USING LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR TREATMENT OF MODERATE ACUTE MALNUTRITION IN UGANDA

In Under-nutrition on November 16, 2013 at 7:14 pm

by Andrew K. Amegovu, Patrick Ogwok, Sophie Ochola, Peter Yiga, Juliet H. Musalima, Emma Mutenyo

from Journal of Food Chemisty and Nutrition – Vol 1, No 2 (2013)

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Abstract

Infant and young child feeding practices in low-income countries are still inadequate leading to high rates of acute malnutrition. Formulas from local food materials are vital in formulations for management of child malnutrition in poor countries because they are affordable. Nutrient composition of sorghum-peanut blend (SPB) mixed with honey and ghee, and micronutrient-fortified corn-soy blend (CSB), a traditional food supplement, were analyzed. Proximate components and beta-carotene amounts were high in both products. Vitamin A level was higher in CSB than SPB. Proportions of essential fatty acids were low. Levels of iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, manganese and sodium were adequate for recovery from moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Energy content of CSB was 421kcal/100g while that of SPB was 430kcal/100g. Levels of condensed tannin, phytates, trypsin inhibitors and aflatoxins were below prescribed limits. In conclusion, levels of nutrients in SPB and CSB were adequate for treatment of MAM in children.

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Development, acceptability, and nutritional characteristics of a low-cost, shelf-stable supplementary food product for vulnerable groups in Kenya

In Uncategorized, Under-nutrition on October 15, 2012 at 8:14 am

 Kunyanga, Catherine; Imungi, Jasper; Okoth, Michael; Vadivel, Vellingiri; Biesalski, Hans Konrad

Food & Nutrition Bulletin, Volume 33, Number 1, March 2012 , pp. 43-52(10)

Abstract:

Background. Food-based approaches have been advocated as the best strategies to curb hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. The use of low-cost, locally available, nutritious foods in the development of supplementary foods has been recommended.

 Objective. To develop low-cost food supplements using different traditionally processed local foods, consisting of cereals, legumes, nuts, fish, and vegetables, to meet the nutrient requirements for vulnerable groups in Kenya.

 Methods. Four food supplements were developed and evaluated by taste panel procedures. The product containing amaranth grain, pigeon pea, sweet potato, groundnuts, and brown sugar was found to be the most acceptable supplement. Evaluation of nutritional composition, shelf-life, and cost analysis of the acceptable supplement was carried out to assess if it could satisfactorily provide more than 50% of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) of the basic nutrients for vulnerable groups.

 Results. The acceptable supplement contained 453.2 kcal energy, 12.7 g crude protein, 54.3 g soluble carbohydrates, 20.8 g crude fat, and 10.1 g crude fiber per 110 g. The micronutrient contents were 93.0 mg calcium, 172.4 mg magnesium, 2.7 mg zinc, 5.7 mg iron, 0.8 mg vitamin B1, 0.2 mg vitamin B2, 7.9 mg niacin, 100 μg folic acid, and 140 μg retinol equivalent per 110 g. The supplement also contained 21% total essential amino acid in addition to appreciable levels of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic fatty acids. The shelf-life study showed that it could be stored in different packaging materials (polythene bags, gunny bags, and kraft paper) at 26°C without deleterious effects on its chemical composition for up to 4 months. Cost analysis of the supplement indicated that the product could be competitively sold at US$0.812/kg (KES 65.50/kg).

 Conclusions. Locally available indigenous foods can be used in the formulation of acceptable, low-cost, shelf-stable, nutritious supplementary foods for vulnerable groups.

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WHO: Supplementary foods for the management of moderate acute malnutrition

In Under-nutrition on October 12, 2012 at 12:34 pm

Original title: Supplementary foods  for the management of moderate acute malnutrition in infants and children 6–59 months of age (Technical note)

by WHO (2012)

(download here a brief version of the document)

This document proposes the nutrient composition of supplementary foods to manage moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) in children under 5 years of age.

Experimental data were used to inform the estimates, taking into consideration the effect of different levels of nutrients and their bio-availability.

The document also lists the principles of nutritional management of children with MAM and reports the assumptions considered to set up the proposed recommendations, suggesting  which uses the latter can be applied for and topics for further research in this area.

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