evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘weight-for-age’

Associations of Suboptimal Growth with All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in Children under Five Years: A Pooled Analysis of Ten Prospective Studies

In Under-nutrition on June 3, 2016 at 3:38 pm

Olofin I, McDonald CM, Ezzati M, Flaxman S, Black RE, et al. (2013) Associations of Suboptimal Growth with All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in Children under Five Years: A Pooled Analysis of Ten Prospective Studies. PLoS ONE 8(5): e64636.

(download)

Abstract

 

Background

Child undernutrition affects millions of children globally. We investigated associations between suboptimal growth and mortality by pooling large studies.

Methods

Pooled analysis involving children 1 week to 59 months old in 10 prospective studies in Africa, Asia and South America. Utilizing most recent measurements, we calculated weight-for-age, height/length-for-age and weight-for-height/length Z scores, applying 2006 WHO Standards and the 1977 NCHS/WHO Reference. We estimated all-cause and cause-specific mortality hazard ratios (HR) using proportional hazards models comparing children with mild (−2≤Z<−1), moderate (−3≤Z<−2), or severe (Z<−3) anthropometric deficits with the reference category (Z≥−1).

Results

53 809 children were eligible for this re-analysis and contributed a total of 55 359 person-years, during which 1315 deaths were observed. All degrees of underweight, stunting and wasting were associated with significantly higher mortality. The strength of association increased monotonically as Z scores decreased. Pooled mortality HR was 1.52 (95% Confidence Interval 1.28, 1.81) for mild underweight; 2.63 (2.20, 3.14) for moderate underweight; and 9.40 (8.02, 11.03) for severe underweight. Wasting was a stronger determinant of mortality than stunting or underweight. Mortality HR for severe wasting was 11.63 (9.84, 13.76) compared with 5.48 (4.62, 6.50) for severe stunting. Using older NCHS standards resulted in larger HRs compared with WHO standards. In cause-specific analyses, all degrees of anthropometric deficits increased the hazards of dying from respiratory tract infections and diarrheal diseases. The study had insufficient power to precisely estimate effects of undernutrition on malaria mortality.

Conclusions

All degrees of anthropometric deficits are associated with increased risk of under-five mortality using the 2006 WHO Standards. Even mild deficits substantially increase mortality, especially from infectious diseases.

Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Are Feasible As a Breastmilk Replacement for HIV-Exposed Infants from 24 to 48 Weeks of Age

In Under-nutrition on March 23, 2013 at 5:54 am

by Valerie L. FlaxMargaret E. BentleyCharles S. ChaselaDumbani KayiraMichael G. HudgensKopekani Z. KachecheCharity ChavulaAthena P. KourtisDenise J. JamiesonCharles M. van der Horst, Linda S. Adair

 

J. Nutr. March 6, 2013 – (download)

 

Abstract

The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition (BAN) Study randomized HIV-infected mothers and their infants to receive either maternal lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) during lactation or no LNS and then to 1 of 3 antiretroviral drug (ARV) arms (maternal, infant, or no drugs).

Assigned interventions were provided from 0 to 28 wk and all infants (n = 1619) were given LNS during (24–28 wk) and following (28–48 wk) weaning. This paper assesses the feasibility of infant LNS as a breastmilk replacement and uses longitudinal random effects models to examine associations of interventions, morbidity, and season with weight-for-age (WAZ), length-for-age (LAZ), and BMI-for-age (BMIZ) Z-scores from 24 to 48 wk.

Infant LNS adherence was high (94.1% ate it daily). From 24 to 48 wk, mean WAZ (−0.42 to −0.76 SD; P < 0.001) and LAZ (−0.93 to −1.56 SD; P< 0.001) steadily declined, whereas BMIZ remained >0 throughout. A higher LAZ was associated with assignment to the maternal LNS arm (β=0.19; P < 0.05). Lower WAZ and BMIZ were associated with seasonal food insecurity (β=−0.08 and −0.09, respectively; both P < 0.001), fever (β=−0.07 and −0.13; both P < 0.001), diarrhea (β=−0.19 and −0.23; both P < 0.001), and assignment to the infant ARV arm (β=−0.17 and −0.17; both P < 0.05).

The magnitude of the season and morbidity effects was small and BAN infants had higher weights and lengths than their counterparts in the general population.

High LNS adherence and the modest impact of morbidity on growth indicate that LNS is a feasible breastmilk replacement for HIV-exposed infants weaned early, but controlled trials are needed to quantify the effects of LNS on growth in this population.

Predictors of stunting, wasting and underweight among Tanzanian children born to HIV-infected women

In Under-nutrition on October 24, 2012 at 7:52 am

McDonald CMKupka RManji KPOkuma JBosch RJAboud SKisenge RSpiegelman DFawzi WWDuggan CP.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct 3

Abstract

Background/Objectives: Children born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women are susceptible to undernutrition, but modifiable risk factors and the time course of the development of undernutrition have not been well characterized.

The objective of this study was to identify maternal, socioeconomic and child characteristics that are associated with stunting, wasting and underweight among Tanzanian children born to HIV-infected mothers, followed from 6 weeks of age for 24 months.

Subjects/Methods: Maternal and socioeconomic characteristics were recorded during pregnancy, data pertaining to the infant’s birth were collected immediately after delivery, morbidity histories and anthropometric measurements were performed monthly. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards methods were used to assess the association between potential predictors and the time to first episode of stunting, wasting and underweight.

Results: A total of 2387 infants (54.0% male) were enrolled and followed for a median duration of 21.2 months. The respective prevalence of prematurity (<37 weeks) and low birth weight (<2500 g) was 15.2% and 7.0%; 11.3% of infants were HIV-positive at 6 weeks. Median time to first episode of stunting, wasting and underweight was 8.7, 7.2 and 7.0 months, respectively. Low maternal education, few household possessions, low infant birth weight, child HIV infection and male sex were all independent predictors of stunting, wasting and underweight. In addition, preterm infants were more likely to become wasted and underweight, whereas those with a low Apgar score at birth were more likely to become stunted.

Conclusions: Interventions to improve maternal education and nutritional status, reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and increase birth weight may lower the risk of undernutrition among children born to HIV-infected women.

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Use of Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements by HIV-Infected Malawian Women during Lactation Has No Effect on Infant Growth from 0 to 24 Weeks

In Under-nutrition on May 31, 2012 at 6:23 am

by Valerie L. Flax5, Margaret E. Bentley, Charles S. Chasela, Dumbani Kayira, Michael G. Hudgens, Rodney J. Knight, Alice Soko, Denise J. Jamieson, Charles M. van der Horst, and Linda S. Adair

J. Nutr. July 1, 2012

Abstract

The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study evaluated the effect of daily consumption of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) by 2121 lactating, HIV-infected mothers on the growth of their exclusively breast-fed, HIV-uninfected infants from 0 to 24 wk. The study had a 2 × 3 factorial design. Malawian mothers with CD4+ ≥250 cells/mm3, hemoglobin ≥70 g/L, and BMI ≥17 kg/m2 were randomized within 36 h of delivery to receive either no LNS or 140 g/d of LNS to meet lactation energy and protein needs, and mother-infant pairs were assigned to maternal antiretroviral drugs (ARV), infant ARV, or no ARV. Sex-stratified, longitudinal, random effects models were used to estimate the effect of the 6 study arms on infant weight, length, and BMI. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds of growth faltering [decline in weight-for-age Z-score (WAZ) or length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) >0.67] using the control arm as the reference. Although some differences between study arms emerged with increasing infant age in boys, there were no consistent effects of the maternal supplement across the 3 growth outcomes in longitudinal models. At the ages where differences were observed, the effects on weight and BMI were quite small (≤200 g and ≤0.4 kg/m2) and unlikely to be of clinical importance. Overall, 21 and 34% of infants faltered in WAZ and LAZ, respectively. Maternal supplementation did not reduce the odds of infant weight or length faltering from 0 to 24 wk in any arm. These results indicate that blanket supplementation of HIV-infected lactating women may have little impact on infant growth.

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