evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘WFP’

Internship Opportunities with the WFP – Ethiopia

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on September 5, 2018 at 7:00 pm

Background

Ethiopia has made important development gains over the past two decades, reducing poverty and expanding investments in basic social services. However, food insecurity and under-nutrition still hinder economic growth. In 2015 it ranked 174 out of 188 in the UNDP Human Development Report. The country is also home to the second largest refugee population on the continent; it currently hosts 909,000 registered refugees from South Sudan, Somalia, Sudan, Eritrea and Kenya. 2016 was a challenging year for Ethiopia as it suffered from the worst El Niño impact in the last 50 years. The onset of El Niño combined with failed Belg (spring harvest) and Meher (main harvest) rains in 2015 left 10.2 million people in need of emergency food and nutrition assistance. While the Government and partners averted a major humanitarian catastrophe, the drought has left a negative legacy on many families, who lost livestock and other productive assets. The residual needs from the past year have been compounded by a new and devastating drought which hit Ethiopia and other parts of the Horn of Africa in early 2017. In  August 2017, the Government of Ethiopia released the Mid-Year Humanitarian Requirements Document which outlined the need to support 8.5 million people with emergency food, nutrition, health, water and education programmes. WFP supports the Ethiopian Government through a range of life-saving and resilience-building activities as well as providing assistance in refugee camps. We use food, cash, nutrition assistance and innovative approaches to improve nutrition, empower women, build local capacities and enhance preparedness to climate-related shocks.

 

Opportunity – WFP Ethiopia Country Office seeks (1) graduate (BSc), and post-graduate (MSc) students looking for field-based dissertation topics, (2) BSc and MSc students already graduated within a year, looking for opportunity hands-on work experience, and (3) researchers looking for settings where to develop operational research topics. Background: Nutrition/Public Health/Epidemiology, Food Technology, Communication, Social Sciences, Logistics, Engineering, Economy and any other field related to food and nutrition.

 

More information

  • What? The interns will be integrated into WFP existing and/or about-to-start programmes. The potential areas include (1) integrated nutrition and food security surveillance, (2) treatment of moderate acute malnutrition, (3) development of social behavioural change communication to reduce stunting and wasting, (4) interlinkages between HIV and malnutrition, (5) food fortification, (6) nutrition advocacy, strategic evidence-based policy- and decision-making, (7) social protection in food insecure households.
  • When? Candidate can apply anytime during the year.
  • Where? According to the Terms of Reference (ToR) and the deliverables of the internship, the candidate will be placed either at WFP Country Office (Addis Abeba) and/or at the provincial Sub-Offices.
  • Supervised by who? Administratively the interns will be supervised by a WFP line manager. The ToR and the deliverables will be agreed by and with the candidate, eventually with the tutor of the institution of origin and WFP.
  • For how long? The duration of the internship will depend on the nature of the ToR and its deliverables.
  • Which kind of support? WFP has limited resources for support to internship programmes. Therefore, candidates are encouraged to rely on their own means of support for living, and international / national travel costs. WFP can cover at least the intern health insurance. Additional WFP support can be put under consideration in case of strong candidatures.
  • I am interested. How to apply? For an initial contact, get in touch with both Filippo Dibari (filippo.dibari@wfp.org) and Pauline Akabwai (pauline.akabwai@wfp.org). Note that the email subject should be reading exactlyinternship at WFP’). Be ready to submit curriculum vitae (one page max), provide specific evidence of your skills, undertake a written test and an interview, share reference contact details.

 

For further reading – Ethiopia nutrition profile – source: Global Nutrition Report 2017 (link  or under request) and WFP Ethiopia Country Profile (Link)

Are you a Nutritionist with HIV Programming experience and fluent in En/Fr?

In Under-nutrition on July 25, 2018 at 5:22 pm

Image result for wfp logoComplete vacancy Announcement available here

QUALIFICATIONS & EXPERIENCE REQUIRED:

Education:  Advanced academic studies in nutrition, public health or related field. The ideal candidate will hold an advanced university degree with a focus on one of the following: International Health & Nutrition, Public Health & Nutrition Policy and Management, Family Health & Nutrition. 
Experience:  Minimum five years of experience in design, implementation and monitoring of nutrition activities, preferably in the context of reaching vulnerable populations in developing countries. 

Sound technical knowledge of the nutritional needs of vulnerable populations, with a specific focus on people living with HIV/AIDS. 

Experience in formulating technical proposals, particularly as related to mobilizing funds to research and pilot nutrition and public health interventions. 

Experience in nutrition survey methodologies, nutrition assessment and relevant statistical data analysis. 

Prior experience with WFP’s work in the field of nutrition and Maternal and Child Health would be an advantage. 

Experience in supporting Social and Behavior Change Communication strategies is desirable. 

Knowledge & Skills:  Strong technical skill and knowledge of nutrition and public health programming in developing countries. 

Strong managerial skills. 

Knowledge of sound research methods and monitoring and evaluation standards. Familiarity with quantitative and qualitative health/nutrition survey techniques is an added value. 

Ability to foster and manage collaborative approaches involving diverse stakeholders. 

Understanding of strategies and program priorities around global nutrition and HIV/AIDS initiatives. 

Excellent analytical and writing skills.

Advanced computer skills with at least intermediate proficiency in Windows based word processing, spreadsheet and nutrition/public health software (i.e. WHO 2006, ANTHRO, EPIinfo, STATA, SPSS, EndNote);

Demonstrated capacity to work with counterparts within and outside of WFP.

General knowledge of United Nations system policies, rules, regulations and procedures governing administration is highly desirable.

 

 
Languages:  Fluency in French and English required. 

WFP: nutrient gap explained in 3 min youtube (fun-to-watch) video

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on February 4, 2016 at 10:18 am

 

WFP: Nine Infographics That Will Help You Teach Hunger

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on July 16, 2015 at 10:27 am

from WFP web site

Between the statistics and vocabulary often used to describe it, teachers know the scale of global hunger can be a challenge to help students understand. These nine “infographics”—visual aids explaining complicated topics

 

Use when teaching hunger-related vocabulary: You’ve heard the term food insecurity, but do you know what it actually means for someone to be considered food insecure? This infographic from Oxfam America explains the difference between food insecurity, famine and other frequently confused hunger-related words.

See it in detail here.

Use when teaching about WFP: The World Food Programme reaches an average of 80 million people in 75 countries each year. To do so, we put 5,000 trucks, 50 aircrafts and 30 ships in motion around the globe at any given time to get food assistance to those who need it. Numbers this large can be difficult to put into perspective. This infographic breaks down WFP’s work, explaining what it means to feed millions around the world each year.

See it in detail here.

Use when teaching about the Syria crisis: Throughout the Syria crisis, which has just entered its fifth year, WFP has been a lifeline to nearly 6 million people through food assistance, food vouchers and e-cards. This infographic breaks down the current needs and WFP’s response as the emergency situation has deteriorated.

See it in detail here.

Use when teaching about the link between hunger and natural disaster: Did you know that 80 percent of the world’s hungry live in disaster-prone and degraded areas? This infographic breaks down the importance of resilience building in reaching a world with Zero Hunger.

See it in detail here.

Use when teaching the impact of hunger and malnutrition: There are 805 million hungry people in the world. In this infographic, the Food and Agriculture Organization breaks down what that number means and what the world must do to overcome it.

See it in detail here.

Use when explaining how the world is fighting hunger: Poverty is one of the major causes of hunger, so people experiencing poverty have the fewest resources to build resilience to natural disasters. The infographic from U.S. Agency for International Development explains how investments in certain initiatives can help to prevent hunger among the most vulnerable.

See it in detail here.

Teaching about maternal and child nutrition: Nutrition for mothers and children is a priority for WFP. This infographic from 1,000 Days explains why this area is such a priority.

See it in detail here.

Teaching about agricultural impact on hunger: It may seem obvious, but food production must increase to meet the needs of a growing population. This USAID infographic explains the critical role of agriculture in meeting the food needs of people around the world.

See it in detail here.

Teaching about the health effects of hunger in children: Hunger can lead to serious health problems in children, including wasting and stunting. What else can it mean? This Feeding America infographic breaks it down.

Learn more here.

Reaching the missing middle: Overcoming hunger and malnutrition in middle income countries

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on April 23, 2015 at 7:00 am

by Shenggen Fan and Ertharin Cousin

wfp logo

from WFP web site

(download entire document)

Hunger and malnutrition are not problems exclusive to low income countries.

That is why the international community cannot realise its ambitious international agenda of achieving zero hunger and malnutrition without a renewed focus on countries in economic transition where hunger and malnutrition remain.

The majority of the world’s hungry and malnourished population now live in Middle Income Countries (MICs).

For these countries to best fulfil their vital role in supporting zero hunger and malnutrition, they must promote effective country-led strategies that will reduce hunger and malnutrition at home.

A new UN body to combat global malnutrition?

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on October 15, 2014 at 10:22 am

By Elena L. Pasquini 14 October 2014

from Devex web site

 

The United Nations is considering setting up a new body to address global malnutrition as early as next month, Devex has learned.

Tentatively called “U.N. Nutrition,” the new entity will be headed by UNICEF and the World Food Program, according to well-placed sources within civil society groups attending this week’s Committee on World Food Security, or CFS, in Rome. Over the weekend, the sources also participated in working groups ahead of the second International Conference on Nutrition — known as ICN2 — jointly led by FAO and the World Health Organization in November.

During the informal talks, the rumor circulated among attendees, Stefano Prato, managing director of the Society for International Development, told Devex in Rome.

“We had confirmation from U.N. insiders [and] also from delegates that there is a concrete plan,” he said.

Civil society groups believe the model for U.N. Nutrition could be Scaling Up Nutrition, a country-led global platform that seeks to unite governments, civil society, U.N. agencies, donors, businesses and researchers in a collective effort to improve nutrition through specific interventions — including support for breastfeeding and nutrition-sensitive approaches in areas such as agriculture or WASH.

“We are [also] quite sure that it will be based on PPPs, integrating governments and the private sector,” Prato added.

U.N. Nutrition could be launched a month from now in ICN2, and civil society organizations hope more details will emerge publicly this week so the plans are “disclosed with transparency” and CSOs are allowed to give feedback on whether “it’s the right answer to malnutrition, or if there are other [solutions].”

UN Nutrition vs. CFS

On Monday, the first session of the CFS was abuzz with gossip over the rumored new agency and how it will complement the current intergovernmental body and multistakeholder platform based in Rome.

For CSOs, the first question was which organization should take the lead in the fight against global malnutrition.

“Nutrition is not a problem of delivering, it is an issue of policies,” Prato said. “We believe the nutrition question has to be addressed through [shared] rules and regulations. That’s why we suggest a strong role for CFS.”

According to the SID official, the involvement of UNICEF and WFP says something about the direction the initiative is taking: “WFP and UNICEF are not organizations where there is a sovereign assembly, such as the FAO or WHO … programs [are] driven by donors and with also a quite restricted range of donors … It is not a context of democratic dialogue and those are not spaces for [defining] policy.”

Civil society, he insisted, wants malnutrition programs to be driven by policies rather than by donors or private sector interests.

“We don’t want this role bypassed by programs defined by donors without mechanisms of consultation and control,” Prato said. “What we fear is the establishment of mechanisms that are not legitimate and not accountable.”

In this scenario, a leading role for the private sector raise further concerns for CSOs, which believe strengthening local food systems based on the diversity of agricultural systems is the key to addressing malnutrition, instead of solutions based on delivery of products, fortification, dietary supplements or processed food.

“Clearly, big multinational corporations … are very much interested [in] that … approach,” Prato said. “What we fear is the participation of the private sector without clear rules of engagement and therefore [leading to] a conflict of interest.”

ICN2, a weak step forward?

The plans for a new U.N. body focused on nutrition is part a process that it is expected to reach its high watermark at the ICN2 in November, when FAO and WHO member states are expected to endorse Sunday’s consensus on a political declaration and framework for action to fight global malnutrition.

But according to Prato, the political declaration is “extremely weak,” as it doesn’t include tangible commitments or provide any timeframe for implementation. Moreover, the framework for action is nonbinding and there is “nothing new” in its concept.

“There is a dilution of the [centrality] of the right to food … the importance of local food systems is mentioned, but very poorly,” he said. “Above all, there are … no obligations … no control and accountability mechanisms … In short, it is fundamentally a big set of words.”

Prato would rather U.N. Nutrition stay within the framework of CFS. The SID official insisted CFS must comply with its mandate to properly address the problem of global malnutrition and argued its role should be strengthened ahead of ICN2.

Is a new U.N. body the solution to combat malnutrition? And how will it complement the current multistakeholder platform based in Rome? Please let us know your thoughts by sending an email to news@devex.com or leaving a comment below.

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WFP: Introducing the CARI (Consolidated Approach for Reporting Indicators of Food Security) | VAM Resource Center

In Under-nutrition on April 7, 2014 at 8:45 am

Capture

 

The Consolidated Approach for Reporting Indicators of Food Security (or CARI)  is a WFP method used to analyse and report the level of food insecurity within a population.

Under the CARI approach, each surveyed household is classified into one of four food security categories.  This classification is based on the household’s current status of food security (using food consumption indicators) and their coping capacity (using indicators measuring economic vulnerability and asset depletion).

Instead of rambling on about the CARI here, we recommend you check out these resources below:

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Enhancing Nutrition: A New Tool for Ex-Ante Comparison of Commodity-based Vouchers and Food Transfers

In Under-nutrition on September 26, 2013 at 2:25 pm

by David Ryckembusch, Romeo Frega, Marcio Guilherme Silva, Ugo Gentilini, Issa Sanogo, Nils Grede, and Lynn Brown

from World Development, Volume 49, September 2013, Pages 58–67

(download for free here)

Summary

This article presents a new analytical tool for ex-ante comparison of the cost-effectiveness of two transfer modalities in pursuing specific nutritional objectives. It does so by introducing a metric to score the nutrient value of a food basket—the Nutrient Value Score (NVS)—and explains how this metric can be combined with full supply chain analysis and costing to generate a new tool, the Omega Value. The use of the Omega Value allows policy-makers who design a program with nutrition objectives to compare direct food transfers and commodity-based food vouchers in terms of both cost efficiency and cost effectiveness.

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Mobile phone technologies to improve the prevention and treatment of malnutrition?

In Under-nutrition on August 23, 2012 at 8:56 am

Source: Rapid SMS – http://www.rapidsms.org/

In 2011, WHO reports:

The use of mobile and wireless technologies to support the achievement of health objectives (mHealth) has the potential to transform the face of health service delivery across the globe.

A powerful combination of factors is driving this change. These include rapid advances in mobile technologies and applications, a rise in new opportunities for the integration of mobile health into existing eHealth services, and the continued growth in coverage of mobile cellular networks.” (download the entire doc)

(To learn more about m-Health, read this paper from the WHO Bulletin: Point of care in your pocket: a research agenda for the field of m-health)

The same WHO document mentions a wide range of  applications, but regretfully does not include the treatment or the prevention of malnutrition, although the potential is there. These are few examples:

  • In Kenya, in 2009, the Millennium Villages Project and the Columbia University looked into the use of SMS to support the community-based management of acute malnutrition in children under five. The pilot study concludes that “an
 SMS
 based
 approach,
 using
 a
 system
 like
 ChildCount,
 can
 lead
 to
 improved
 maintenance
 of
 child‐specific
 anthropometric 
records
, which 

effectively 
help in 
monitoring 
a 
community’s
 health”
 (see the entire doc)
  • In Malawi, more recently, “UNICEF deployed SMS to address serious constraints within the national Integrated Nutrition and Food Security Surveillance (INFSS) System, which was facing slow data transmission, incomplete and poor quality data sets, high operational costs and low levels of stakeholder ownership.  Health workers now enter a child’s data, and through an innovative feedback loop system, Rapid SMS instantly alerts field monitors of their patients’ nutritional status. Automated basic diagnostic tests are now identifying more children with moderate malnutrition who were previously falling through the cracks.  This system also increased local ownership of the larger surveillance program through two-way information exchange.  Operational costs for the Rapid SMS system are significantly less than the current data collection system. The Government of Malawi is considering a national scale-up later this year” (read more here)
  • In the last 2 years, the same organization (Rapid SMS) has successfully piloted in Ethiopia a RUTF stock reporting and request system. This has the potential for improving the communications of stock levels and requests up the supply chain and consequently for avoiding supply breaks (more info here at page 42, and here)
  • WFP focuses on the prevention and treatment of moderate acute malnutrition and has also been involved with innovations using cash/vouchers and SMS for monitoring the implementation of programmes and for monitoring cases of malnutrition (read more at page 24 of this document)
  •  In 2011, UNICEF and Valid International undertook a “Global Mapping Review of Community-based Management of Acute Malnutrition” (with a focus on Severe Acute Malnutrition). In countries of interest, the same document suggests a review of innovative technologies to improve information flow to national level. Those include the use of Rapid SMS to improve timeliness and quality of reporting.  “Many countries have started or are recommending use of Rapid SMS“, because “the large number of centres makes compilation & transmission difficult”. For this reason, moving “towards Rapid SMS to improve transmission” is crucial.

Some of the organizations with promising capacities to design SMS platforms, and helping in fighting malnutrition, are listed here:

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Note that:

the Forum on Community-based Management of Acute Malnutrition will be preparing a more detailed Technical Brief on the subject of M-health and E-health in the coming months.

Feel free to contact the Forum, if you are interested in m-health & nutrition, or in any other aspect related to Community-management of Acute Malnutrition.

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Question: you know any other experience in this area of nutrition and m-health? Worth reporting on this blog? Please, share that: leave a comment (down here), or contact me.

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Context-specific choice of food aid items (USAID)

In Under-nutrition on August 12, 2012 at 10:22 am


(click directly on the flowchart for an enlarged view)

In a recent document (2011), USAID, in collaboration with the UN Global Nutrition Cluster, UNHCR WFP and other organizations, suggest which type of programme and food commodities are more adequate.

However, it was concluded that there is no one food product that can meet every kind of programming goal, and no one programming approach that fits all needs.

The same panel  developed decision trees and few flow charts to help policy makers and donors in taking more informed decisions about programmes and choice of food-products.

The original program guidance is available here, whereas another version of the same, visible above, was adjusted in one chapter of my PhD thesis.

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