evidence-based blog of Filippo Dibari

Posts Tagged ‘WHO’

WHO: e-Library of Evidence for Nutrition Actions (eLENA), now on a mobile app

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on June 16, 2017 at 8:26 pm

from WHO webpage

eLENA mobile phone application

Since 2011, the WHO e-Library of Evidence for Nutrition Actions (eLENA) has provided more than 1 million users with evidence-informed guidance and related information for nutrition interventions. Though the reach of eLENA continues to expand through a steady increase in the number of website users, there is a recognized need for access to eLENA content in settings without regular or reliable internet access.

In order to address this unmet need, the Nutrition Policy and Scientific Advice Unit of the WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development has developed an eLENA mobile phone application, eLENAmobile, which delivers much of the content of eLENA to smartphones and can be accessed anywhere – no internet connection required.

Download eLENAmobile for iPhones and Android smartphones now, at Google Play or the Apple App Store.

UNICEF/WHO/WB: Levels and Trends in Child Malnutrition

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on June 7, 2017 at 7:02 pm

source: World Bank webpage

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(download)

In May 2017, UNICEF, WHO and World Bank Group released the 2017 edition of the joint child malnutrition estimates for the 1990–2016 period, representing the most recent global and regional figures. A suite of on-line interactive dashboards were developed to enable users to explore the entire time-series (1990 – 2016) of global and regional estimates of prevalence and number affected for stunting, overweight, wasting and severe wasting. These estimates are presented by various regional and income group country classifications used by various agencies including the United Nations, UNICEF, WHO and The World Bank Group.

Note: Global estimates refer to the aggregate of the UN regions.

WHO: Updates on the management of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children Guideline

In Under-nutrition on April 27, 2015 at 7:02 am

(from WHO website)

Publication details

Editors: World Health Organization – 2013
Number of pages: 111
Languages: English, French

(Full document)

Overview

This guideline provides global, evidence-informed recommendations on a number of specific issues related to the management of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children, including in the context of HIV.

The guideline will help Member States and their partners in their efforts to make informed decisions on the appropriate nutrition actions for severely malnourished children. It will also support Member States in their efforts to achieve global targets on the maternal, infant and young child nutrition comprehensive implementation plan, especially global target 1, which entails achieving 40% reduction by 2025 of the global number of children under 5 years who are stunted and global target 6 that aims to reduce and maintain childhood wasting to less than 5%.

The guideline is intended for a wide audience, including policy-makers, their expert advisers, and technical and programme staff in organizations involved in the design, implementation and scaling-up of nutrition actions for public health. The guideline will form the basis for a revised manual on the management of severe malnutrition for physicians and other senior health workers, and a training course on the management of severe malnutrition.

Evidence

WHO Collaborating Centre: new Bachelor’s Degree in Global Nutrition and Health

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on November 6, 2014 at 11:53 am

from the web page of the WHO Collaborating Centre at the Metropolitan University College

Being an official WHO Collaboration Centre makes the Bachelor’s Degree in Global Nutrition and Health part of a strong international network.

A WHO Collaboration Centre

The Bachelor’s Degree in Global Nutrition and Health under the Faculty of Health and Technology, Metropolitan University College, is designated as a WHO Collaboration Centre (WHO CC) for a four year period (2010-2013). The Metropolitan University College is hereby part of a global network comprising 80 other WHO Collaboration Centres, five of which are in Europe.

What is a WHO Collaboration Centre?

The Who Collaboration Centres (WHOOC’S) are a highly valued mechanism of cooperation in which relevant institutions are designated by WHO to support the implementation and achievement of the Organisation’s planned strategic objectives at the regional and global levels; enchanting the scientific validity of its global health work; as well as developing and strengthening institutional capacity in countries and regions.

“Prior to the establishment of the Centre, we regularly passed on our research results to WHO and EU projects dealing with nutrition and health in Europe, especially projects looking at the relationship between obesity and inequality, such as EURO-PREVOB and PolMark. In addition, staff at Global Nutrition and Health were involved in organizing the Move for Health days in 2008 and 2009”

Metropolitan research and development consultant Aileen Robertson, one of the key figures in the work with WHO

Definition:

A WHO Collaborating Centre is an institution designated by the Director-General to form part of an international collaborative network carrying out activities in support of the Organisation’s programmes at all levels.
WHO gains access to top centres worldwide and the institutional capacity to support its work and ensure the scientific validity of global health work.

A result of years of collaboration

Global Nutrition and Health’s cooperation with the World Health Organisation  began in 2006, and in recent years, the programme has worked with the WHO on a number of projects.

A seal of approval for the Bachelor Programme

Being a WHO Collaboration Centre brings many advantages for the bachelor programme:

  • It enhances our visibility, vital for our marketing programme
  • It is essential for the programme’s global objectives, that we receive many applications from potential student from different parts of the world
  • It opens the possibility for international collaboration with other WHO CCs
  • It opens the possibility of establishing international internship placements and agreements under WHO auspices increasing the possibilities for teachers and student to participate in research projects
  • It will help students to find internship places and work
  • It will increase job satisfaction

“I am convinced that Global Nutrition and Health’s designation as a WHO Collaboration Centre will have a positive impact on the future development and growth of the programme. It is a seal of approval that will be important for recruiting staff and students. “

Hanne Gillett, Head of the Bachelor Programme in Global Nutrition and Health

Future focus on inequality and nutrition

Future collaboration with the WHO will include research into nutrition, obesity and social inequality, courses and training in specific nutrition issues, and summer schools with nutrition training, e.g. for doctors and nurses. Study trips and internships will also be on the agenda.

UNICEF-WHO-The World Bank: Joint child malnutrition estimates – Levels and trends

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on October 31, 2014 at 3:51 pm

from the WHO website

Since 2012 UNICEF, WHO and the World Bank have been reporting joint global and regional estimates of child malnutrition. The inter-agency team regularly revises the joint data sets and updates the global and regional trend estimates, from 1990 to the present. The estimates of prevalence and numbers for child stunting, underweight, overweight, wasting and severe wasting are derived by United Nations (UN), Millennium Development Goal (MDG), UNICEF, WHO regional and World Bank income group classifications.

In 2012 the inter-agency group derived estimates up to 2011, in 2013 up to 2012 and in 2014 up to 2013. The rationale being that country data are at maximum available from surveys conducted in the year previous to when the modelling exercise takes place.


A new UN body to combat global malnutrition?

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on October 15, 2014 at 10:22 am

By Elena L. Pasquini 14 October 2014

from Devex web site

 

The United Nations is considering setting up a new body to address global malnutrition as early as next month, Devex has learned.

Tentatively called “U.N. Nutrition,” the new entity will be headed by UNICEF and the World Food Program, according to well-placed sources within civil society groups attending this week’s Committee on World Food Security, or CFS, in Rome. Over the weekend, the sources also participated in working groups ahead of the second International Conference on Nutrition — known as ICN2 — jointly led by FAO and the World Health Organization in November.

During the informal talks, the rumor circulated among attendees, Stefano Prato, managing director of the Society for International Development, told Devex in Rome.

“We had confirmation from U.N. insiders [and] also from delegates that there is a concrete plan,” he said.

Civil society groups believe the model for U.N. Nutrition could be Scaling Up Nutrition, a country-led global platform that seeks to unite governments, civil society, U.N. agencies, donors, businesses and researchers in a collective effort to improve nutrition through specific interventions — including support for breastfeeding and nutrition-sensitive approaches in areas such as agriculture or WASH.

“We are [also] quite sure that it will be based on PPPs, integrating governments and the private sector,” Prato added.

U.N. Nutrition could be launched a month from now in ICN2, and civil society organizations hope more details will emerge publicly this week so the plans are “disclosed with transparency” and CSOs are allowed to give feedback on whether “it’s the right answer to malnutrition, or if there are other [solutions].”

UN Nutrition vs. CFS

On Monday, the first session of the CFS was abuzz with gossip over the rumored new agency and how it will complement the current intergovernmental body and multistakeholder platform based in Rome.

For CSOs, the first question was which organization should take the lead in the fight against global malnutrition.

“Nutrition is not a problem of delivering, it is an issue of policies,” Prato said. “We believe the nutrition question has to be addressed through [shared] rules and regulations. That’s why we suggest a strong role for CFS.”

According to the SID official, the involvement of UNICEF and WFP says something about the direction the initiative is taking: “WFP and UNICEF are not organizations where there is a sovereign assembly, such as the FAO or WHO … programs [are] driven by donors and with also a quite restricted range of donors … It is not a context of democratic dialogue and those are not spaces for [defining] policy.”

Civil society, he insisted, wants malnutrition programs to be driven by policies rather than by donors or private sector interests.

“We don’t want this role bypassed by programs defined by donors without mechanisms of consultation and control,” Prato said. “What we fear is the establishment of mechanisms that are not legitimate and not accountable.”

In this scenario, a leading role for the private sector raise further concerns for CSOs, which believe strengthening local food systems based on the diversity of agricultural systems is the key to addressing malnutrition, instead of solutions based on delivery of products, fortification, dietary supplements or processed food.

“Clearly, big multinational corporations … are very much interested [in] that … approach,” Prato said. “What we fear is the participation of the private sector without clear rules of engagement and therefore [leading to] a conflict of interest.”

ICN2, a weak step forward?

The plans for a new U.N. body focused on nutrition is part a process that it is expected to reach its high watermark at the ICN2 in November, when FAO and WHO member states are expected to endorse Sunday’s consensus on a political declaration and framework for action to fight global malnutrition.

But according to Prato, the political declaration is “extremely weak,” as it doesn’t include tangible commitments or provide any timeframe for implementation. Moreover, the framework for action is nonbinding and there is “nothing new” in its concept.

“There is a dilution of the [centrality] of the right to food … the importance of local food systems is mentioned, but very poorly,” he said. “Above all, there are … no obligations … no control and accountability mechanisms … In short, it is fundamentally a big set of words.”

Prato would rather U.N. Nutrition stay within the framework of CFS. The SID official insisted CFS must comply with its mandate to properly address the problem of global malnutrition and argued its role should be strengthened ahead of ICN2.

Is a new U.N. body the solution to combat malnutrition? And how will it complement the current multistakeholder platform based in Rome? Please let us know your thoughts by sending an email to news@devex.com or leaving a comment below.

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WHO: Nutritional care and support for patients with tuberculosis

In Under-nutrition on December 1, 2013 at 10:19 am

by WHO, 2013 (download)

Overview

“This guideline provides guidance on the principles and evidence-informed recommendations on the nutritional care and support for patients with tuberculosis.

“Undernutrition increases the risk of tuberculosis and in turn tuberculosis can lead to malnutrition. Undernutrition is therefore highly prevalent among people with tuberculosis. It has been demonstrated that undernutrition is a risk factor for progression from tuberculosis infection to active tuberculosis disease and that undernutrition at the time of diagnosis of active tuberculosis is a predictor of increased risk of death and tuberculosis relapse. However, the evidence concerning the effect of nutritional supplementation on tuberculosis prevention and health outcomes among people with tuberculosis had not previously been systematically reviewed.

“Member States have requested guidance from the World Health Organization (WHO) on nutritional care and support for patients with tuberculosis.

“The primary audience for the guideline is health workers providing care to people with tuberculosis. However, the guideline is also intended for a wider audience including policy-makers, their expert advisers, and technical and programme staff at organizations involved in the design, implementation and scaling-up of nutrition actions for public health.”

 

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WHO: Promoting Healthy Growth and Preventing Childhood Stunting

In Under-nutrition on October 6, 2013 at 6:03 pm

from the WHO website:

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As part of the work on implementing the project “Promoting healthy growth and preventing childhood stunting”, the World Health Organization has worked with various experts to prepare nine papers for a supplement of the Maternal and Child Nutrition Journal. The papers will contribute to ongoing reflections on multiple aspects of the challenges presented by a World Health Assembly 2012 target for stunting reduction and ways to address them.

You can download the chapters (free) from the Maternal and Child Nutrition web site. September 2013. Volume 9, Issue Supplement S2. Pages 1–149

Latest WHO release: “Essential Nutrition Actions: Improving maternal, newborn, infant and young child nutrition”

In Over-nutrition, Under-nutrition on June 12, 2013 at 4:51 pm

by WHO web page

Downloads:  Full document – pdf, 1.09Mb

Overview

Malnutrition in all its forms is closely linked, either directly or indirectly, to major causes of death and disability worldwide. The causes of malnutrition are directly related to inadequate dietary intake as well as disease, but indirectly to many factors, among others household food security, maternal and child care, health services and the environment. While most nutrition interventions are delivered through the health sector, non-health interventions can also be critical. Actions should target the different causes to reach sustainable change, which requires a multisectoral approach.

This document provides a compact of WHO guidance on nutrition interventions targeting the first 1,000 days of life. Focusing on this package of essential nutrition actions (ENA), policy-makers could reduce infant and child mortality, improve physical and mental growth and development, and improve productivity. Part I presents the interventions currently recommended by WHO, summarizes the rationale and the evidence, and describes the actions required to implement them. The document uses a life course approach, from pre-conception throughout the first 2 years of life. Part II provides an analysis of community-based interventions aimed at improving nutrition and indicates how effective interventions can be delivered in an integrated fashion. It shows how the ENAs described in the first part have been implemented in large-scale programmes in various settings, what the outcomes have been, and to examine the evidence for attribution of changes in nutritional outcomes to programme activities.

Related links

 

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